Cornerstone

Under Construction

Lesson 1

  1. Identity
  2. What is your identity? Write a paragraph defining yourself.
  3. Identity
  4. Look at what you wrote. How many of those things could change? If you lost those things, then who would you be?
  5. Edit your identity paragraph to try to have it only contain unchangeable truths.

Lesson 2

  1. What’s the why behind your life?
    • “Your life purpose consists of the central motivating aims of your life‚ÄĒthe reasons you get up in the morning. Purpose can guide life decisions, influence behavior, shape goals, offer a sense of direction, and create meaning.” (source)
  2. Write a paragraph telling the why behind your life.
  3. Is it something that gives you purpose for today and for ten years from now?
  4. What’s the Point of My Life?
  5. If not, then rework your paragraph until you have a universal truth to spur you forward.

Lesson 3

  1. How do you make decisions?
    • Small ones – what to wear or eat
    • Medium ones – what to do, how to spend your time
    • Really big ones – life decisions like college, career, marriage
  2. Write a paragraph that explains your process.
  3. Is it the same for all types of decisions? Did your “why” play into it at all? Is your identity reflected and preserved in the process?
  4. If not, rework your paragraph until your decision-making process reflects your who and why.

Lesson 4

  1. Think about something you need to decide about, choose a big or medium decision. Work through the steps in the linked article, Decision Making.
  2. Write out each step.
  3. Does your decision line up with your who and why?
  4. If not, what’s wrong? How can you make sure your decision lines up with your who and why?

Lesson 5

  1. What are your daily and weekly routines?
  2. Write them down. What do you do typically each day and each week?
  3. List what you typically do in a day and the time spent doing each thing.
  4. List any non-daily activities that you typically do during the week. Write the amount of time you spend doing each one.
  5. Do any of these tips for breaks and rest fall into your daily or weekly routine?
  6. If not, work on your schedule to make sure you take time for quiet time.

Lesson 6

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Goals
  3. Make a goal for today.
  4. Make a goal for the week.
  5. Make a goal for the month.
  6. Make a goal for the year.
  7. Are your goals achievable?
  8. If not, reassess your goals.

Lesson 7

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 1 on the list.
    • …craft a handwritten note, place it in an envelope, address said envelope, stamp it and mail it.
    • When your family needs a package or oversized letter mailed, offer to take it to the post office to mail it (or go with a parent and leave them in the car and take care of it for them). You don’t have to do this today. Just be on the lookout for when you can do this.

Lesson 8

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 2 on the list.
    • find their polling place
    • If you are 18, register to vote (if you choose to do so). Feel free to use your decision-making skills on that one.

Lesson 9

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 3 on the list.
    • …use a phone for making phone calls
    • Call a business. Ask your parents if you can order something or make an appointment for them, but otherwise, just call a business and ask a question.
    • You aren’t done today’s school work until you’ve done it.

Lesson 10

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 4 on the list.
    • …get cash
    • If you use a debit card at a store, you can ask if they will give you cash. Of course, they aren’t giving you money, it’s being taken from your bank account. So, what do you need to know? How much money is in your account!

Lesson 11

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day and for the week.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Look at this example of what it means to comparison shop. Look at the tag in the picture and understand the total price and the unit price. The unit price in this case is the cost per ounce, oz.
  5. Go to the grocery store with a notebook and pencil. Pick one type of product. Comparison shop. Write down the name, price, and unit price of each.
  6. Which is the cheapest product (price)?
  7. Which is the cheapest for what you are getting (unit price)? You may have to do some calculating if your tags don’t make it easy.

Lesson 12

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 6 on the list.
    • …know where in the car the car manual is kept and that if there is an issue they should refer to the manual for guidance. Look at the dashboard behind the steering wheel. Do you know what all the symbols mean? Go get out the manual and look something up. Look at the index to see what’s included. An index is in the back of a book and is in alphabetical order.
    • They should be able to fill their tires with air, pump gas and know what to do in the event of a flat tire. Ask your parents if you can go do those first two things for them or with them.
    • Ask your parents what you should do if you have a flat tire. If they expect you to change it, now would be a good time to learn and practice.

Lesson 13

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 7 on the list.
    • …read a map and follow directions without using GPS.
  5. If you have an atlas at home, open it and read a map. Choose two places and find a route between them.
  6. If you don’t have an atlas at home, print a map to use or use one online.

Lesson 14

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Identify basic nutritional elements
  5. Write down everything you ate over the last 24 hours. Use labels and online tools to write down the nutritional content of each thing. Write the number of calories, the amount of protein, the amount of fiber, the amount of different types of fat and sugar, vitamins, etc.
  6. Look at the recommended calories for your age. How did you do? (This is just some generic idea, not about you in particular. If you gain weight, you are probably eating more calories than you are using. Calories are just measures of energy. If you are losing weight, you aren’t taking in as many calories as you are using. Unless you are overweight, your goal should just to be about the same weight (within five pounds). Your weight changes even during the day, so never try to stay the exact same weight. And girls, your weight will go up naturally at a certain time each month. It will also just naturally go back down. Your weight is something to check every few months, never a few times a day.
  7. Look at the nutrition you took in. Look at the recommendations. Where do you fall short?
  8. My secret to nutrition is to pray before I eat. ūüôā I receive my food with thanksgiving. I receive my food as a gift from God and all His gifts are good and perfect.

Lesson 15

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 9 on the list.
    • …write a check
    • …deposit a check
    • …know where to endorse a check
  5. Ask your parents for a check to use to practice on. Or copy it or print one out from online.
  6. What are the different parts of the check and what they are for?
  7. Ask your parents for a deposit slip to fill out, or print one.

Lesson 16

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Make a goal for the week.
  4. Life Skills
  5. Do number 10 on the list.
    • …do the laundry, or at least your own laundry
    • Learn when you would want hot water and when you would want cold water.
    • Do you know what might make your clothes shrink? (hot air)
    • Do you know what might make your clothes pink? (red piece of clothing washed in warmer water, especially if it’s new)
    • It may be time, if your parents are agreeable, for you to take on doing your own laundry on the regular.

Lesson 17

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 11 on the list.
    • …wash the dishes
    • If you have a dishwasher, run it. Hint: don’t use the liquid dish detergent sitting by the sink.
    • Are there any mugs/pots/pans in your kitchen can’t go in the dishwasher?
    • Find the dishwasher safe symbol on something in your kitchen.

Lesson 18

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 12 on the list.
    • …sweep up
    • Get out a broom and clean up something. Brooms are especially good for getting under edges of cabinets.
    • …use a vacuum attachment
    • Get out your vacuum if you have one. Know how to run it, but also add an attachment and clean something other than the floor. Suck up cobwebs in high corners and clean between and under the couch cushions.

Lesson 19

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 13 on the list.
    • …pack for a trip
    • Go for it. Pack for a weekend trip. What will you need? Where are you going? What’s the weather going to be like?
    • Then put it all away; unpacking is a skill too.

Lesson 20

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 14 on the list.
    • …sign your name
    • …recite your social security number
    • Practice as much as you need to. Take the time to do them both until you can do them.

Lesson 21

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Make a goal for the week.
  4. Make a goal for the month.
  5. Life Skills
  6. Save and use leftover food.
  7. How do you know if food has gone bad? What can you do to make sure you use the food before it’s bad? Come up with a system.
  8. Make sure you are reusing your food storage containers. They aren’t one-time use.

Lesson 22

  1. We’re going to be learning about different types of insurance. We’ll spend several days on this, so you don’t have to get it all today, but really, your parents may not completely understand. The more you understand, the more power you have, but at least understanding in general is necessary.
  2. But first, let’s work on some terminology.
    • premiums – the amount paid to an insurance company
    • deductibles – the amount you have to pay before the insurance company will do their part
    • claim – your request to the insurance company to pay for something you believe they should cover
  3. Look at them in health insurance.
  4. Look at them in car insurance.
  5. Look at the in home insurance.
  6. What were some other terms defined in these articles? What do they mean?

Lesson 23

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Learn about car insurance. You can stop at “lesson plan.”
  5. Learn from your parents what type of car insurance they have. Why did they choose that?
  6. Do they know what their coverage is? Do they know where to find their plan? Can you get it out and look at it to see what their coverage is? Try to understand what you are looking at.
  7. Go get out your insurance card from the car. Don’t take it out of the car! Put it back. But you need to know where it is.

Lesson 24

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Learn about health insurance.
  5. What does your family use for health insurance? (It could be from work. It could be a Christian medical expense sharing plan. It could just be Jesus and that would be awesome.)
  6. Why did they make that decision?
  7. How long are you able to stay on your family’s health insurance?
  8. What does it cover? What is the deductible?
  9. If you have a wallet, you could keep a copy of your insurance in your wallet.

Lesson 25

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Learn about more types of insurance.
  4. Can insurance be a waste?
  5. Should Christians have insurance?

Lesson 26

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Make a goal for the week.
  4. Life Skills
  5. Understand these signs.
  6. If you disobey one of these signs, you could end up with a ticket on your car, or with your car towed. Then what would you do? Figure that out.

Lesson 27

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 18 and 19 on the list.
    • …understand over-the-counter medication.
    • If you have any in your house, make sure you understand dosage.
    • You need to also understand they aren’t harmless. Things that you put in your body have an effect on your body. Read the warnings on the bottles you have at home. (My brother ended up in the hospital from taking over-the-counter pain medication in the prescribed amount.)
    • Medications can’t just be mixed willy-nilly. Ask a pharmacist, even about over-the-counter medication.
    • Medication should never be mixed with alcohol.
    • If you have a prescription from a doctor, you take it to a pharmacy. They will get you the medication. You may need to ask your doctor for a refill when you are running low if you are supposed to continue. Don’t wait until you are out because it can take a couple of days to get a refill.

Lesson 28

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 20 on the list.
    • tie shoelaces
    • tie a tie and/or tie a bow
    • tie up a trash bag so it can’t leak
    • Can you do these things?
    • Find a video on youtube or ask for help.

Lesson 29

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Make a budget.
    • Make a list of all the bills your family gets.
    • Gas, water, electric, trash, cell phone, internet,…
    • Which are regular each month? Which are variable?
    • Write down these basic costs on a list and add them up.
    • What else needs to be on a budget? (Hint: food!)
    • Ask your parents to look at a credit card bill. What else does your family spend money on? How much?

Lesson 30

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 23 on the list.
    • …know the shelf life of foods.
    • Go through the shelves, pantry, fridge, and freezer and get rid of anything expired.
    • Your fridge and freezer may have things that are out of their original container so that you can’t check the date, but decide if it’s old or not. “If in doubt, throw it out.”

Lesson 31

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Make a goal for the week.
  4. Life Skills
  5. Do number 24 on the list.
    • …change a light bulb
    • …change a battery
    • …change the sheets on your bed including your pillow case (you could wash them)
    • …change the trash bag (take out the trash while you’re at it)

Lesson 32

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 25 on the list.
    • …apply for a job and/or internship.
    • Just do it for the experience. Ideally, it would be for something you’d want. But even if not, you can politely turn them down if they offer it to you. “Thank you for your time, but I’ve decided to take another opportunity right now.”

Lesson 33

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Know how to use the microwave, oven, and stove. Turn them on. Use them. Turn them off.
  5. Set the timer while you work. Turn the fan and light on. Turn them off.
  6. Change the clocks on them and then change them back.

Lesson 34

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 27 on the list.
    • …ventilate.
    • Learn why you should never be in a closed garage with the car running, or open can of paint or such substance.
    • How much ventilation is enough? How do you know when you need a break from being in the area?
  5. While we’re on the subject, is there anything small place in the house that could use some paint?

Lesson 35

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 28 on the list.
    • …why shouldn’t you put something hot or wet on most surfaces?
    • What are good things to use to put them on?

Lesson 36

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Make a goal for the week.
  4. Life Skills
  5. Do number 29 on the list.

Lesson 37

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 30 on the list.

Lesson 38

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Life Skills
  4. Do number 33 on the list.
    • …learn what clogs a sink, tub, or toilet and how to unclog them
  5. Ever hear the expression: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure? How do you prevent a clog
    • in a toilet?
    • in the tub?
    • in the sink?

Lesson 39

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. Practice your signature and social security number today. They relate to our lesson today.
  4. Reading contracts…did you ever click that you’ve read the terms and agreements without reading them? Of course you have. So have I. Once an actor was hired to read one of those. It took a full 24 hours. Many of them aren’t meant to really be read. The thing is that they are holding you to it.
  5. When you get a paper contract in your hand, you need to stop and read it. It can be hard when the person waiting for you to sign is right there waiting on you. They might be telling you it’s just standard. But, you have to read it. You should ask questions. What does this mean? When you sign your name, you are bound that to. That’s your word you are committing to. You need to know what you are committing to.
  6. Here’s a sample contract. What’s it for? What are you agreeing to?
  7. Here’s another sample contract. What’s it for? What are you agreeing to?
  8. What can you do if you don’t like something about the contract? Ask what alternatives there are. Decide if it’s something you are willing to walk away over.

Lesson 40

  1. Did you take quiet time yet today?
  2. Make a goal for the day.
  3. They say it takes 40 days to make a new habit. So, here’s your last daily reminder. Have you formed a habit? The easiest way to do what you want to be doing is to make it a habit that you just do naturally.
  4. Do you have a bank account? If not, you should have one.
  5. Even if you have one, research bank accounts. What’s the difference between checking and savings accounts?
  6. Vocabulary
    • account – where your money is held – a number identifies the account – the account type identifies what you can do with the account and what the account can do for you
    • interest – a percentage – the amount of extra money you earn or pay (We’ll look more at interest in another lesson)
    • withdraw – money you take out of the bank
    • deposit/credit – money you put into the bank
    • transfer – moving money from one account to another
    • Banking Terms
    • Banking Terms
  7. Do research online and compare banks and their interest rates¬† and fees. Here I mean interest you would earn by having your money in that account. Look at “brick and mortar” banks and online only banks. Make sure to include your family bank.
  8. You should be able to have an account without paying any monthly costs. You should also be able to have an account that earns you interest. The bank is making money from your money. You should to.
  9. Make a decision about what type of account or accounts you should have. Why? Use your decision-making skills.
  10. Now, do something about it and follow it through until it’s done.

Lesson 41

  1. First, let’s look at interest on the positive side, the interest that you earn by investing or by putting your money in an interesting earning bank account.
  2. Make a savings plan, make two savings plans. Make a pretend one and change the settings around see what happens. And then make one that could potentially be possible, both in terms of initial deposit, monthly deposit, and interest earned (based on your research from before).
  3. What’s the difference between an account that compounds daily, monthly, and annually?
  4. What does your family’s bank account do?
  5. What do you think about carrying out your savings plan?
  6. What would happen if you did your savings plan for ten years? For an interest rate you could use, our family’s current APY is 0.4%.
  7. If you want to play around with really long term savings, here’s a calculator.

Lesson 42

  1. Notice that a bank (at the current time of writing is giving less than one percent interest), money you earn on your savings.
  2. While your money is in their bank, they are investing your money and growing it. They are making maybe 5 – 7 percent interest or more on your money.
  3. One of the ways they are making that money is by lending it at interest to other people like you. People take out loans to pay for a car or for a house remodeling project or for starting or building a business.
  4. Did you get that? They give 0.5% (or less) and take 5% (or more).
  5. $100 at 0.5% is 100 x 0.005 = $0.50. You would earn 50 cents. $100 at 5% is 100 x 0.05 = $5.00. You would have to pay $5 extra. That’s a simplified view, but that’s the idea and the difference between earning and borrowing.
  6. Play with a loan calculator.
  7. Shop for a car. And then “take out a loan.” Try the calculator and see what you’d have to pay monthly and how much you’d pay overall. You can put in 120 months. That’s 10 years.
  8. How much was the price of the car? How much would you have to pay overall?
  9. Ask your parents about their car loans.

Lesson 43

  1. Learn about mortgages, a type of loan for buying a house.
  2. Here’s another mortgage explainer.
  3. Understand what this page shows. It’s a mortgage calculator. Before you play with it. Notice the price of the house, the down payment, and how much interest you would pay.
  4. Did you notice the interest you pay is enough to buy another house?
  5. You can play with the calculator. Ask your parents about their mortgage.

Lesson 44

  1. Learn about credit cards.
  2. An average credit card interest rate is 16%. It can be much more. That makes it the worst kind of debt in terms of wasting your money, just giving it to the banks.
  3. Play with this credit card calculator and understand what this page is showing. How much interest would you be paying? Remember, that interest is just money you are paying for nothing. You are basically paying for being impatient, for not being willing to wait and save. It’s money people spend when they haven’t learned to delay gratification.

Lesson 45

  1. Learn why you should avoid any debt.
  2. My family has avoided all debt. Some would say that a mortgage and some business-type loans are “good debt” because they are an investment that can earn you money in the long term. But, that’s not a guarantee.
  3. Debt is enslavement. Our family says, “Own no many nothing but love” from Romans 13:8.
  4. Being debt free has meant a lot to our family. It meant that God had to do miracles at times to pay for things for us. And He did. Here are some of those stories. It also meant living with my parents for three years when we returned from the mission field because we couldn’t bring ourselves to take on a mortgage. Even though it seemed impossible to get a house without a mortgage, the Lord did it. We have a house and are debt free. We have two cars, debt free. (We have four drivers and two cars. That’s the delayed gratification part!)
  5. Here’s an article about delaying gratification. I mentioned that term in a previous lesson.
  6. How is delaying gratification related to making goals?
  7. So, why have I been having you make goals?
  8. Goal making and knowing the why behind your goal gives you a framework and reasoning behind making your decisions, so your decisions much easier to make.
  9. I stopped telling you each lesson to make a goal and stopped asking about take a quiet time. Have you kept it up? If those are good habits you want to build until they are ingrained, then choose them for yourself and do them every day until they are habit and you don’t have to think about doing it; they just get done.

Lesson 46

  1. You’ve made it through a quarter of the course.
  2. Make a list of what you’ve learned so far. If you haven’t done some of the things, you could make today a day you do them (clean, mail, bank account).
  3. Today’s a day to be grateful for what you’ve learned.
  4. Write two thank you notes. Say thank you to someone who has taught you something. It could be your mom and dad, but if so, still write nice thank you notes.
    • Make it look like you are thankful. Use nice paper and good handwriting.
    • Make it sound like you are thankful. Don’t just say thanks. Say specifically what you are thankful for.
    • And the best way to make it look and sound like you are thankful is to really be thankful!
    • Be grateful for what you have and those who have given it to you.
  5. Keeping a stash of thank you cards is a nice idea.

Lesson 47

  1. Earlier you called a business on the phone. Today we’re going to talk to some people in person.
  2. This week you have to talk to three neighbors and to three workers at a business. You may have to hold off on the business one until you can go with your parents to the grocery store or some other place of business.
  3. This will be your assignment for lessons 48 – 50.
    • Talk to workers at a business. Ask for help finding something. Meet the checkout clerk. That’s workers, plural, more than one.
    • Meet your neighbors. You are going to talk to neighbors for at least five minutes. If the first conversation wasn’t long enough, you’ll have to go to another home.
  4. Learn about making conversation.
  5. Make a list of things you are interested in that you could ask about. Make a list of questions you could ask. You already have something in common with these people. You live in the same place. How long have they been in their house/apartment?

Lesson 48

  1. Meet your neighbors, again. You are going to talk to neighbors for at least five minutes. If the first conversation wasn’t long enough, you’ll have to go to another home.
  2. Talk to workers at a business. Ask for help finding something. Meet the checkout clerk.

Lesson 49

  1. Meet your neighbors, again. You are going to talk to neighbors for at least five minutes. If the first conversation wasn’t long enough, you’ll have to go to another home.
  2. Talk to workers at a business. Ask for help finding something. Meet the checkout clerk.

Lesson 50

  1. Meet your neighbors, again. You are going to talk to neighbors for at least five minutes. If the first conversation wasn’t long enough, you’ll have to go to another home.
  2. Talk to workers at a business. Ask for help finding something. Meet the checkout clerk.

Lesson 51

  1. Ask your mom or whoever does the cooking in your house for a complete tour of your kitchen.
  2. Know your pots from your pans. What does she use each one for typically?
  3. What does she use the different knives or peelers for?
  4. Look at the measuring spoons and cups. Read the measurements on them. Know the difference between a tablespoon (T.) and teaspoon (t.).
  5. Learn how to turn on the stove and oven. Try them both. Don’t just watch. Touch. Do.
  6. Learn what she uses the different utensils for and which are for cooking and which are for serving.
  7. Look through the pantry, the shelves, the cabinets. Are there any ingredients or tools you don’t know what they are?
  8. Read the names of the spices and ask what she would typically use each for.

Lesson 52

  1. The most basic cooking skill is chopping. You’ll need to peel and chop.
  2. Gather up some foods you can peel and chop today. You can peel and chop an apple, a carrot, etc. Those are good choices because you can just eat up what you cut.
  3. But it would also be nice to practice with an onion and garlic, basic ingredients you will use all the time.
  4. Learn about peeling and chopping.
  5. Now practice. Do at least three things.

Lesson 53 (egg, potato, carrot, onion, garlic, salt, pasta)

  1. Today’s lesson is on boiling, heating water until it reaches boiling point, 100 degrees Celsius, and bubbles. This will also mean that it’s reached the point where the water is turning into vapor and evaporating. You will lose water when it boils, so one thing to learn is to make sure you have enough liquid in the pot.
  2. Learn the difference between boiling and simmering.
  3. Hard boil an egg
    • Place an egg in a small pot.
    • Cover it with cold water until it’s submerged about an inch.
    • Bring to boil on the stovetop over high or medium high heat. (Move to next assignment while you are waiting on that.)
    • When it boils, remove the pot from the heat and cover it.
    • Set a time for 10 minutes. Less time will make it creamier and runnier. Don’t let it sit for less than 4 minutes.
    • When they are finished, run it under cold water to stop the cooking and make it so that you can hold it.
  4. Cook pasta.
    • Fill a pot over halfway full with water and cover it.
    • Turn it on high to heat to a boil.
    • Check the egg water. If it’s not boiling or about to start boiling, move onto the next assignment.
    • When the water is at a rolling boil, take off the lid, add some pasta. Look at the box for how long it should cook. Figure out what time it should be done.
    • When that time comes around, around 8 minutes later maybe, fish out a piece. Run it under cold water. Taste it. If it is hard, it needs more time. If it is chewy, give it another minute and then taste another piece. It should be soft.
  5. Make broth.
    • Put two cups of broth in a small pot.
    • Turn it on high to heat.
    • Check on your eggs.
    • Wash a carrot. Chop off the ends and cut it into a few chunks. Put it in the water.
    • Check on your eggs and pasta water.
    • Cut off the ends of the onion. Cut it in half and peel off the outer layer, even if that means the last layer of the onion. Sometimes that’s easiest instead of trying to just peel off the papery part. Put it in the water.
    • Check on your egg and pasta pots.
    • Peel a garlic clove and throw it in whole.
    • Once your broth boils, turn it down to a simmer. Cover it (you want to keep your liquid).
    • After an hour, come back and take out the vegetables. Add a quarter teaspoon of salt and a shake of black pepper. Stir to dissolve. Give it a taste.
    • Add another quarter teaspoon if it needs more flavor.
    • The long a broth simmers, the more flavor it will have. This is exactly how you would make chicken noodle soup, except you’d throw in a chicken drumstick. The bone will add flavor and the fat from the skin will certainly make it tastier.
      • To finish the soup, you would take out everything from the broth. You would add back in the cooked chicken in small pieces and add peeled and chopped carrot, onion, and garlic.
      • Add the salt at the end of the process, when you are getting close to eating it because then you can control how it tastes.

Lesson 54  (a chicken strip or thin chicken breast, carrot or onion)

  1. Today you are going to sauté. (saw-tay)
  2. The chicken in the chicken noodle soup isn’t that tasty. The broth is what has the flavor really.
  3. To get the flavor, you need to season the meat and cook it to give it color. You want your food, meat and vegetables to have a brown color, like a crusty brown, not just the color it turns when boiled.
  4. Put two pans out on the stove. Heat them over medium high heat. (Note: if you were doing beef, I would have you heat it to the highest heat possible.)
  5. Pat your chicken dry with a paper towel. Wash your hands and keep the chicken on a small plate that will get washed or put in the dishwasher as soon as the chicken is in the pan. Chicken is one of those things that isn’t safe to eat raw, so you don’t want raw chicken juice on your hands that could get in your mouth.
  6. Peel and chop your vegetable. If you start to see smoke, remove your pan from the heat!
  7. When you are ready, check to see if your pans are hot by dropping in a little water. Get a little water on a spoon and pour it into the pan. The water should dance around and evaporate quickly.
  8. Add two or three tablespoons of oil to the pan. This can be butter instead of oil. Butter can burn so you need to act quickly. Olive oil will smoke at a lower temperature than canola oil.
  9. Typically, home cooks don’t use as much oil or salt as real chefs. When I learned to really cook, from scratch instead of from American recipes that were really ads for cans and boxes, I learned that oil and salt make everything taste good! I learned to cook from scratch as a missionary. We didn’t have all the convenience foods of America, but I also went once a week to a friends house to cook a meal. We shopped at the pazaar for the ingredients and then the matriarch of the home coached me through making the meal. Then my husband would bring our kids (only two at the time) over and our families would share a meal together. It was the home of his language teacher, and his best friend to this day. The lesson is to not be afraid of oil and salt.
  10. You can let the oil warm up. The oil should be shimmering if it’s hot, but I like to test it by getting a little water on my finger and flicking it at the pan. If the oil is hot, the water will make it pop. That’s not a super safe thing to do. Be careful! Hot oil burns. It’s hot. Sometimes I even wear an oven mitt when sauteing if there is liquid making it pop. Now, can you see the wisdom and patting dry your chicken?
  11. For your carrot or onion, place them in the hot pan. Stir them around for a few minutes. Turn the heat down to medium or medium low and let them sit.
  12. Salt and pepper your chicken. If you want to get fancy, you can put something else on it as well. Laying it down gently in the pan, don’t splash oil. Let it sit for four minutes (or so). You are going to look for it to get halfway white. You’ll see the color change up the side of the chicken. When it’s halfway done, flip it over and let it sit. You want it to get brown. You have to leave it alone to get that color.
  13. Give your vegetables a stir. If they are getting black or getting too dark too quickly (you do want the insides of things to cook and not just have a burnt outside and uncooked middle), add more oil to your pan.
  14. If you were going to make ground beef, I would have you first cook onion, then add garlic and cumin or whatever other spice for another minute or two before adding the beef. Those are called aromatics, the good smelling stuff. You want to give them some attention to bring out their flavors before they get lost in the dish.
  15. Wait. When you flip your chicken, give your vegetables another stir.
  16. After another four minutes, cut your chicken open to see if it’s done. It should be white inside and you should see the strings of the muscle. Don’t over cook to make sure it’s done. It will get dry and un-tasty.
  17. Your chicken and your vegetables should have some brown on the outside. Brown food tastes good.
  18. Salt your veggies before you remove them from the pan.
  19. The longer you cook onions and carrots the sweeter they get, but you just have to cook them until they are soft. This will depend on how thinly you sliced them.

Lesson 55

  1. Today you are baking. Decide with whoever cooks in your home what you could bake. You could do meat or vegetables. I will give instructions for a baked potato as well as some tips.
  2. Here are some tips and tricks.
  3. Preheating the oven means turning it on before you put in the food to get it to the temperature you are going to be cooking the food at. Some ovens preheat quickly, some slowly. Get to know your oven.
  4. Brown the meat in the saute pan before you put it in the oven. Give it a brown crust.
  5. Covering a dish with aluminum foil will help keep things juicy, but it will keep it from browning. If it’s something like chicken with skin, you’ll want to uncover it for the last fifteen minutes to get some color on the skin.
  6. Covering the bottom of a dish with aluminum foil before you put in the ingredients will keep the pan clean.
  7. Adding a little water to a pan of chicken and/or veggies can help keep them from drying out or getting burnt.
  8. Some vegetables like brussel spouts are really only tasty roasted in the oven. If you don’t like a food one way, try cooking it in another way.
  9. Bake a potato, regular or a sweet potato. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees (200 Celsius). Wash the potato. Stick a fork into it in several places to pierce the skin. This lets steam escape. I have exploded a potato in the oven before! If you want to get fancy, rub a little oil all over it and sprinkle it with salt. Put it on a pan or on aluminum foil and put it in the oven. It will take about an hour. You can pierce it with a knife down to the middle of its inside to see if it’s done. If it goes in easily, then it’s soft on the inside. That means it is done.

Lesson 56

  1. Today, make a menu. You have this week to make a breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack. You must cook from scratch. That means no bags, no boxes, no cans, no jars. The exception is something with just one ingredient, such as a seasoning or pasta.
  2. Here are some places for recipes and ideas.
  3. Once you have your menu plan, make a shopping list. See what you have in your home and make sure what you need will be available when you plan on cooking. Make a plan for when you will shop for the rest and when you will cook, especially if you plan on making this food for everyone in your family. It’s great to cook for your family. It’s also great to know how to cook for yourself or for just two people.
  4. Life Lesson: Read all the directions before you start.

Lesson 57

  1. Cook from scratch for your family, breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack. You may not use boxes, bags, cans, or jars of prepared foods. Buy real garlic and peel and chop it, don’t use pre-chopped garlic, for instance. Don’t use jar spaghetti sauce. You can make your own. Get some tomatoes.
  2. Work on your meal plan. Complete all four meals by Lesson 60.
  3. You may do more than four!

Lesson 58

  1. Cook from scratch for your family, breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack. You may not use boxes, bags, cans, or jars of prepared foods. Buy real garlic and peel and chop it, don’t use pre-chopped garlic, for instance. Don’t use jar spaghetti sauce. You can make your own. Get some tomatoes.
  2. Work on your meal plan. Complete all four meals by Lesson 60.
  3. You may do more than four!

Lesson 59

  1. Cook from scratch for your family, breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack. You may not use boxes, bags, cans, or jars of prepared foods. Buy real garlic and peel and chop it, don’t use pre-chopped garlic, for instance. Don’t use jar spaghetti sauce. You can make your own. Get some tomatoes.
  2. Work on your meal plan. Complete all four meals by Lesson 60.
  3. You may do more than four!

Lesson 60

  1. Cook from scratch for your family, breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack. You may not use boxes, bags, cans, or jars of prepared foods. Buy real garlic and peel and chop it, don’t use pre-chopped garlic, for instance. Don’t use jar spaghetti sauce. You can make your own. Get some tomatoes.
  2. Work on your meal plan. Complete all four meals by Lesson 60.
  3. You may do more than four!

Lesson 61

  1. Learn about time management.
  2. Take a blank page  in a notebook or on the computer and list all the times from when you usually wake up until you usually go to bed. List them in half hour increments.
  3. Fill in ALL the times. Write in what you think  you normally do all day. Hold onto this. Pay attention today to how you are spending your time and see how it compares to what you thought.

Lesson 62

  1. Learn about time management for students.
  2. Make a list of what you need to accomplish in a day and what you want to do/accomplish. We’re talking about a Monday-Friday kind of day.
  3. List each thing separately and write down how much time it takes up.
  4. Then list any activities you have that aren’t every day, like maybe some activity you are involved in. List how much time it takes and what day(s) it is on.

Lesson 63

  1. Make a schedule. Start with a daily schedule for the work week. There are more directions on this below. Have you learned to read all the directions before you start something?
  2. Then you could also work on a weekend calendar or even a weekly or monthly calendar.
  3. Are you working your quiet time and goals into the schedule?
  4. Take a blank page  in a notebook or on the computer and list all the times from when you usually wake up until you usually go to bed. List them in half hour increments.
  5. Fill in ALL the times. Something should be scheduled for every time slot. Something can take up more than one time slot.

Lesson 64

  1. Now throw off your schedule and adapt and be flexible.
  2. Plan a fun activity. Create a treasure hunt or scavenger hunt or escape room or some such puzzle event for your family, friends, or younger siblings. Create it and carry it out today.
  3. Why? Creativity and flexibility are leadership skills!

Lesson 65

  1. Now get back on schedule. Part of being flexible is being able to get back on track.
  2. Does your schedule need adjusting? Tweak it. Be willing to tweak it a little even daily.
  3. The schedule doesn’t rule you. It’s there to serve you. It should help keep you on track and help you know what to do next so you don’t get distracted doing other things because you can’t think of what else you need to be doing.
  4. Your schedule can help you reach your daily and weekly goals.
  5. If you know it’s a day with an extra activity, adjust the schedule, don’t throw it out. Make sure what needs to get done gets done.
  6. Always consider “eating the frog” and putting the hardest thing first.

Lesson 66

  1. If you want your parents to say yes to something, what do you usually do? How do you approach them? What do you know is effective or not effective?
  2. Learn about persuasion.
  3. Read some more about the psychological factor.

Lesson 67

  1. Make another plan. This time you need to accomplish a couple of things. You are going to make a plan that includes working together with others (it could be as simple as building/making something with siblings) and that will require you to persuade your parents to let you.
  2. Write out the plan like a proposal. You have Lesson 67 and Lesson 68 to do this.
    • Your proposal should be in the format.
    • Summarize ideally in one sentence your goal. Think about this. I want to make a mess in the living room/kitchen with my siblings isn’t going to get approved likely.¬† Whereas this would get better reception: I want to encourage creativity and collaboration among my siblings by spending recreational time together building/making …
    • List your plan in steps. I will guide a discussion to come up with a plan. We will collect our materials. With your permission to the timing, we will build/make… When we are finished, we will work as a team to leave the area cleaner than it was before and all materials will be put away.
    • State your projected budget and time schedule.
    • Thank them for their interest in your growing important skills in your siblings.
  3. This is just an example. You don’t have to work with your siblings, but you MUST collaborate with at least one other person. The more people, the more training in managing you get!
  4. You will also have to be creative to come up with an idea, flexible to fit in your schedule, and along with all that will have to manage your time to get everything else done that needs to.
  5. You have Lesson 68 to get this finished.

Lesson 68

  1. You are going to finish your proposal if you haven’t already. (See Lesson 67.)
  2. You will also need to plan your persuasion. Hopefully you built some of that into your proposal.
  3. Think about other factors. When is the best/worst time to approach your parents?
  4. What did you learn about persuasion that you can apply here to make your request. (See Lesson 66.)
  5. Submit your proposal and make your case.
  6. You have Lesson 69 as a day to complete this collaborative project. You do have an assignment, though. You will learn about collaboration. Please read that BEFORE completing your collaborative project.

Lesson 69

  1. Learning about collaboration, working together.
  2. Carry out your project. You are working together. This isn’t something you are doing. The point is to lead the team. Keep them happy! You need to follow through on that clean up.
  3. If there is a problem, you can work together to come up with a solution. You are in charge. You can solve the problem or lead the time in listening to ideas and then choosing one.
  4. You have to make the workers happy (siblings) and the boss happy (parents). That’s an example, but I hope you see the connection.
  5. A leader isn’t just accomplishing a task. That’s a big part of it, but it’s not the only part of it. If you want more work in the future, you have to please the person you are working for. If you don’t want to be doing the work yourself, you need to have others who want to work with you!

Lesson 70

  1. Let’s stop and assess.
  2. Make a list of five things that went well during the project.
  3. Make a list of five things that didn’t go well during the project.
  4. Do not list a person as something that didn’t go well. It wasn’t the person; it was maybe an attitude.
  5. For each good thing, write a sentence about what made that go well.
  6. For each bad thing, write a sentence about what made that not go well.
  7. Write a few more sentences about what you could have done to help those bad things turn around.
  8. Hold onto this.

Lesson 91

  1. We’re halfway through. Let’s pause for some inspiration. We’re going to watch some TED talks.
  2. The Power of Passion and Perseverance
  3. The Danger of a Single Story

Lesson 92

  1. The Power of Introverts
  2. Everyday Leadership

Lesson 93

  1. How to Speak so that People Want to Listen
  2. Lessons on Self Confidence
  3. What Adults Can Learn from Kids

leadership experience – 5 skills each as a unit, event as culmination (used these links)

public speaking  (phone call, workers, neighbors)

creativity (treasure hunt)  Creativity 1

flexibility/adaptability (throw off schedule)  Adaptability 1 (another dealing with attitude)

time management (schedule)  Time Management (for students)

persuasion    Persuasion 2 (another on the psychological factor)

collaboration, working in teams, working with others, dealing with difficult people  Collaboration

 

Ted talks?

taxes

resumes

independent life

maintenance/repairs

They should have some idea how to do their taxes or at least know what paperwork they need to collect for someone else to do their taxes.

commitment

responsibility

diligence (senioritis)

cooking again — measuring —

When you are cooking a cake, it’s done when you can stick a fork in the middle and pull it out and it’s clean. If there is batter on it, it’s not done. It will also pull away from the edges of the pan. If you are to “prepare” a pan or “grease” a pan, that means to rub oil or butter on the pan to make it non-stick. To flour a pan means to rub on the butter and then sprinkle flour all over it. Shake it around to spread out the flour. Then turn it upside down over the sink or trashcan and shake out the excess flour.

I’m pretty sure this is our family’s go-to <a href=”https://www.hersheyland.com/recipes/hersheys-perfectly-chocolate-chocolate-cake.html&#8221; target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>chocolate cake recipe</a>. Be careful adding boiling water. It’s a no-fail recipe. It always comes out great. We eat it with no icing.

When you make cookies, the secret is to take them out before they are hard. The edges should be browning, but the center should be soft.

Take them out and leave them on the pan on the cooling rack for two minutes. Then carefully move them off the pan onto the cooling rack. They should be so soft they would fall apart if you picked one up by the edge. They will solidify as they cool but remain soft.

cleaning!

 

How Then We Should Live Francis Schaeffer

Roman Empire

Middle Ages

Renaissance   

The Reformation

The Revolutionary Age

The Scientific Age

The Age Non-Reason

The Age of Fragmentation

The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence