American Literature

This course was created by Rebecca Epperly Wire. You can contact her through the Facebook community group with questions.

Please review the FAQs and contact us if you find a problem.

Credits: 1

Recommended: 10th, 11th, 12th (This is typically the 11th grade course.)

Prerequisite: Literature and Composition, This follows British Literature and Composition in the progression, but it can be taken without having completed the other.

Test Prep: American Literature CLEP

Course Description: Students will receive an overview of American literature from the founding of the nation to contemporary pieces. Literary study will be infused with historical applications for a better understanding of the social and historical context of the readings. Literary terms and elements of poetry will be discussed throughout this course. Vocabulary will include literary terminology as well as general terminology important for high school students to learn. Grammar instruction will be given through various writing assignments. Writing assignments will include Responses to Literature journal entries, a Reflective Essay, a Poetry Explication Essay, a Rhetorical Analysis, a Persuasive Research paper, and a final writing project with a Literary Analysis. Students will have a few novels assigned for outside class reading. Chapters will be selected and assignments given with a deadline of the end of the week. This will help students practice meeting deadlines and it will help us move through more of the literature available to us.

The writing in Responses to Literature should:
•    show that they understand the main character(s) and the plot of the text
•    show that they understand the overall meaning or message of the piece
•    share their feelings, judgment, opinions, or evaluation based on careful reading of the text
•    support their points about the characters and theme with evidence and examples from the story
•    demonstrate an understanding of the historical and literary elements common to that particular time period as we’ve learned about them in class
•    serve as a means of “open book” study during unit tests (at parent’s discretion)
•    lend itself to a possible expansion into an essay due at a later date
•    use proper grammar, word choice, transitions and clear writing.

Each Response to Literature should be at least 250 words in length. The entries should be graded out of 30. You will find a Writing Rubric: Writing a Response to Literature here. It is pages 6-7 of PDF (or pages 4-5 of the document itself).

If students are not already using an ad blocker, I’d recommend installing one to prevent distractions and any mistaken clicks on ads appearing on sites we will be using.

Quizzes/Tests: There will be a few quizzes throughout the course on specific readings. Every 10 days students will have a Vocabulary Quiz (matching). At the end of each quarter (45 days), there will be a test. In addition to questions about readings, literary periods, and terminology, the tests will have a vocabulary matching section. You should study your quizzes in preparation for your quarterly exams. The final exam will not be cumulative.

Reading List: In order to make this course more complete, we had to choose at least one more recent novel. Due to copyright laws and public domain access, this one book will not be available online for free. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee will start on Day 98. This book will need to be obtained by a Kindle purchase, the local library, or used bookstore. This Mass Market Paperback version is inexpensive.

Students will have a few novels assigned for outside class reading. Chapters will be selected and assignments given with a deadline of the end of the week. This will help students practice meeting deadlines and it will help us move through more of the literature available to us.

Short Stories: The Earth on Turtle’s Back (Onondaga), When Grizzlies Walked Upright (Modoc), Navajo Origin Legend, Young Goodman Brown (Hawthorne), The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (Irving), Rip Van Winkle (Irving), The Fall of the House of Usher (Poe), The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County (Twain),  How to Tell A Story (Twain), An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (Bierce), To Build A Fire (London), The Open Boat (Crane), The Story of An Hour (Chopin), The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (Fitzgerald), Old Man At The Bridge (Hemingway), The Jilting of Granny Weatherall (Porter)

Poetry: To My Dear and Loving Husband (Bradstreet), Prologue (Bradstreet), Huswifery (Taylor), Thanatopsis (Bryant), Old Ironsides (Holmes), The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls (Longfellow), A Psalm of Life (Longfellow), Stanzas on Freedom (Lowell), The Raven (Poe), The Tell-Tale Heart (Poe), Annabel Lee (Poe), I Hear America Singing (Whitman),  A Noiseless Patient Spider (Whitman), I heard a Fly buzz – when I died (Dickinson), The Soul selects her own Society (Dickinson), Hope is the thing with feathers (Dickinson), I measure every Grief I meet (Dickinson), Learning to Read (Harper),  Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind (Crane), The River-Merchant’s Wife: A Letter (Pound), Birches (Frost), The Road Not Taken (Frost), Mending Wall (Frost), Any Human to Another (Cullen), Traveling through the Dark (Stafford), Morning Song (Plath), Blackberrying (Plath), The Writer (Wilbur), Boy at the Window (Wilbur), We Real Cool (Brooks), Still I Rise (Angelou)

Plays: Trifles (Glaspell)

Letters/Essays/Speeches: To The Right Honourable William, Earl of Dartmouth (Wheatley), Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (Edwards), Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death (Henry), Gettysburg Address (Lincoln), I am alone (I am the last of my family) (Cochise), I Will Fight No More Forever(Chief Joseph), Ain’t I A Woman? (Truth), Solitude of Self (Stanton), Is it a Crime For A Citizen of the United States to Vote? (Anthony), The Negro Artist and The Racial Mountain (Hughes), I Have A Dream (King), Letter from a Birmingham Jail (King)

Novels: The Scarlet Letter (Hawthorne), The Red Badge of Courage (Crane), My Antonia (Cather), To Kill A Mockingbird (Lee)

Selected Readings: Of Plymouth Plantation(Bradford), A Model of Christian Charity (Winthrop), The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (Franklin), The Crisis (Paine), Nature (Emerson), Self-Reliance (Emerson), Solitude (Thoreau), Civil Disobedience (Thoreau)

Day 1(**)

Unit: The Colonial and Early National Period (Beginnings-1830)

  1. (*)Print out your Grading Sheet for the first quarter or use the Excel version.

Vocabulary

  1. Keep a vocabulary notebook and/or note cards for terms you will be learning about. You will have bi-weekly vocabulary quizzes throughout the course and vocabulary words will appear on your unit tests.
  2. You will be studying terminology related to the historical context of the period we are discussing as well as literary terminology.
  3. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning:  narrative, archetype, myth, oral tradition

Reading*

  1. Always take notes as you complete your readings, keeping in mind upcoming tests and writing assignments. This is a literature survey course. We are looking at individual authors and their works, but also at the big picture in literary movements and their historical context.
  2. Read about Native American Oral Literature.
  3. Read the Onondaga tribe’s story, “The Earth on Turtle’s Back”.
  4. Read the Modoc tribe’s story, “When Grizzlies Walked Upright”.
  5. Read the The Navajo Origin Legend.
  6. *Complete the Native American Myths Handout.
  7. What makes these myths (and others like them) essential to American Literature?
  8. Native American literature is rooted in oral tradition and stories were passed down. Myths discussed beliefs about the origin and nature of the physical world, social order, appropriate behavior, human nature, as well as good and evil.
  9. Oral literature was often characterized by repetition and ritual.
  10. Archetypes were common in these stories as good vs. evil was represented often with characters like a mother goddess, an old man, a trickster, water, fire, celestial elements, etc.
  11. Outside Reading Assignment: Over the first 3 weeks of this course, you will read Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel, The Scarlet Letter, in addition to the reading assignments I will list on each day’s work. Today you will receive a reading assignment and a related work assignment. The reading and assignment should be completed by the end of the week. You can decide how much you want to read each day to stay on schedule. The outside reading should NOT be considered optional. You will be tested on this material within this course and it will be literature you should know about for the American Literature CLEP.
  12. The Scarlet Letter (1850) has some heavy subject matter, so parents should be aware of the specific themes discussed. It is important to be familiar with this novel when discussing significant works of American Literature.
  13. Watch the video summary.
  14. Download the study guide for The Scarlet Letter. (If you print this to work offline, please note that page numbers needed are the page numbers of the pdf itself-as shown in the toolbar, not the page numbers written on the study guide.)
  15. For this week, read Chapters 1-8 of The Scarlet Letter. Complete pages 1-8 of your Study Guide. You should expect to be done this assignment by Day 5. Day 5’s Reading portion of your class will go over this assignment. (When assignments tell you to discuss in your small group, instead discuss the issues with a parent or other adult in your household. The portions labeled “Extending Your Response” are optional. Try to complete everything else.)

Writing

  1. Read about Close Reading of a Literary Passage.
  2. Read about Annotating and Close Reading.

Day 2

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: conceit, oxymoron , parallelism/parallel structure,

Reading

  1. Watch this short video on the settling of Jamestown in 1607.
  2. Read about John Smith.
  3. Read about John Smith’s journals and writings.
  4. Early American writers first had to ensure their own survival before they could think about writing for entertainment. These early writings were more about keeping historical records than of creating something with literary value, so these works would be narratives, descriptions, observations, reports, journals, and histories. We need to be mindful of this when reading them in this current day.

Day 3

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: litotes, allusion, connotation, denotation, style,

Reading

  1. Read about the Puritans.
  2. Read about William Bradford.
  3. Watch the video and read about the Mayflower Compact.
  4. Read this article containing excerpts from Bradford’s “Of Plymouth Plantation”. (Use the questions to help direct the notes you take on what Bradford writes.)
  5. Bradford uses several literary devices to create his own style. The way an author uses language is his or her style. If an exam question asks you to describe the style an author uses, you should describe the rhetorical devices the author uses to create his or her style.
  6. “But to omit other things. . .” is an example of beginning sentences with a coordinating conjunction. Can you find anymore in the text?
  7. Look again at the definition of litotes from your vocabulary. Bradford uses this device in his writing. Here is one example: “…they were not a little joyful…” Can you find another example in the text?
  8. Look back at yesterday’s definition of parallelism or parallel structure. Can you find any examples of parallel structure in Bradford’s work? Here is one: “…they had now no friends to welcome them nor inns to entertain or refresh their weatherbeaten bodies; no houses or much less towns to repair, to seek for succor. . .”  Bradford uses infinitives and nouns to create an orderly listing of what the Pilgrims are going through.

Writing

  1. Read about 7 Critical Reading Strategies. (Yes, this is related to writing!)

Day 4

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: hyperbole, personification, alliteration

Reading

  1. Read about Calvinism in New England Puritan Culture.
  2. Tell someone what T.U.L.I.P. means.
  3. Puritans believed that God had absolute sovereignty and authority. They believed sin was something to be fought and that it was God’s grace that saved those he elects. Of course these beliefs would influence the literature they produced.
  4. Read about Puritanism in American Literature.

Day 5

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: diction, assonance, consonance

Reading

  1. Today you should be done Chapters 1-8 of The Scarlet Letter as well as pages 1-8 of the study guide.
  2. Go over your completed study guide papers with your parent/guardian.

Writing

  1. Write a Response to Literature for the first eight chapters of The Scarlet Letter. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  2. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Day 6

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: ambiguity, anachronism, anecdote

Reading

  1. Read about John Winthrop.
  2. Read about the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Scroll down to where it reads “Early History” and read that section.
  3. Read an excerpt from “A Model of Christian Charity” by beginning with the words, “Now the onely way to avoyde this shipwracke”. (Use your function keys for a search for that phrase on the page. It’s toward the bottom.) Read to the end of the page.
  4. How does John Winthrop’s “A Model of Christian Charity” provide a founding vision for his colony? For the future United States of America?
  5. What does this sermon explain about the beliefs and goals of the Puritans?
  6. This sermon may be seen as a “motivational speech.” What is Winthrop communicating with his audience that may make them feel motivated or feel positively about?
  7. A very powerful and lasting image comes from the phrase “city on a hill.”  Think carefully about this image. What concrete ideas does it make you think about? What’s the significance of a literal city on a hill? What imagery would Winthrop be creating for his Puritan community and their sense of mission?
  8. Outside Reading Assignment: For this week, read Chapters 9-15 of The Scarlet Letter. Complete pages 9-12 of your study guide. You should expect to be done this assignment by Day 10. Day 10’s Reading portion of your class will go over this assignment. (When assignments tell you to discuss in your small group, instead discuss the issues with a parent or other adult in your household.)

Day 7

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: lyric, apostrophe, captivity narrative

Reading

  1. Puritan literature was usually written in a very plain style. It was characterized by clear expression – short words, direct statements.
  2. Learn about America’s First Book, The Bay Psalm Book.

Writing

  1. You will have a Reflective Essay due on Day 30. Essays are to be 500-700 words long.  Here is the Reflective Essay Rubric you will be using to grade this essay. Review the rubric for an idea of what is expected of you and refer to it as you write your essay. A reflective essay is your chance to write about your own views of a personal encounter or experience. This type of writing is more than just your personal feelings. Writing reflective essays is an important element in academic writing. It requires analysis and personal reflection with substance to it. We will be going through lessons to help teach you how to craft a strong essay. Everyone will write at their own pace, so you may need to revisit the writing lessons at different points in the course. That is fine. Use your time wisely to be able to complete the essay by (or before!) the due date.
  2. Your papers should be presented in MLA format style. Use this MLA Formatting and Style Guide to assist you.
  3. Choose from the following ideas: a life-changing experience, a mistake, or a world event.
  4. Life-changing experiences can be happy or traumatic, but they can have a tremendous impact on us. Discuss your mentality and life’s direction before the event and how things have changed since. How has the experience shaped your goals and thoughts about the future?
  5. We all make mistakes, but some mistakes change us. Your outlook or the direction your life was going may have been changed by this mistake. Think about what led up to the mistake, what you could have done differently, and how that mistake changed you for better or worse. If this mistake impacted you in a negative way, what steps have you taken to change things for the better?
  6. Sometimes world events can have a huge impact on us. Was this event a good thing or a tragedy? Think about and analyze the way the event affected others and how it personally affected you. For this type of essay, you’d need to use credible facts and references. Share what you believe would be steps the community or political realm could either take to prevent it from happening again – or if it’s a good thing – to encourage it to happen again.

Day 8

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: rhythm, iamb, trochee, meter

Reading

  1. Read about Anne Bradstreet.
  2. Anne Bradstreet’s writings focused on the themes of Puritanism, motherhood, matrimonial love, nature, feminism, humility, sickness and death.
  3. Read the poem “To My Dear and Loving Husband”(1678).
  4. Read the article, Anne Bradstreet: “To My Dear and Loving Husband”.
  5. Read the poem, “Prologue”.
  6. What is the poem’s meter? (answer: iambic pentameter)
  7. What is the poem’s rhyme scheme? (answer: ABABCC)
  8. What are some words used in “Prologue” which show a position of humility? (answer: “mean” “foolish, broken, blemished,” and “weak or wounded”)
  9. Look over the 5th stanza of “Prologue”. What do you think the speaker is describing?
  10. Women in that time were not supposed to find interest in things outside of their husbands and family life. As a writer, Anne Bradstreet was breaking all the rules. Her writing was criticized harshly because she was a female and because she spoke out against the societal roles for women.
  11. Anne Bradstreet was the first North American to have a book of poetry published. This is significant for several reasons. Bradstreet was a woman and a Puritan. She expressed her faith, her love for her husband, and her love for her home in her writings. However, she was not always content when it came to the restrictions placed on women by her society. She used her writing to publish her thoughts on all of these things.

Writing

  1. Read the article “What is Reflective Writing?”
  2. Take notes to help you plan your Reflective Essay.

Day 9

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: anapest, dactyl, spondee 
  2. Review your vocabulary from the past two weeks for your quiz tomorrow.

Reading

  1. Read about Phillis Wheatley 1753–1784.
  2. What are some facts that make Phillis Wheatley an important figure in American Literature? Write them down in your notes.
  3. Read “To The Right Honourable William, Earl of Dartmouth”.
  4. Read the information and summary on the same page.
  5. What were Wheatley’s motives for addressing a poem to Dartmouth? What reason does the poem give for her love of freedom?

Writing

  1. Start to gather your ideas for your Reflective Essay. Brainstorm about your topic. This is a reflective essay, so you need to spend a lot of time reflecting on the topic you’d like to talk about.
  2. Reflective writing includes description (what, when, who) and analysis (how, why, what if). You are using your writing as an exploratory tool.
  3. You are going to be using different aspects of writing and language for your reflective essay. You will be using descriptive methods as you are outlining your topic. You will use explanatory language as you are explaining to your reader why or how this incident happened. Finally, you will be using expressive writing and language (I think, I feel, I believe).
  4. Think about writing strong sentences even as you are describing feelings. Try not to use slang (colloquial language). The mechanics of your writing should be checked for errors. Always give your best effort.

Day 10(*)

Vocabulary*

  1.  *Take Vocabulary Quiz #1. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 25, not 26. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: pyrrhic, trimeter, tetrameter

Reading

  1. Today you should be done Chapters 9-15 of The Scarlet Letter as well as pages 9-12 of the study guide.
  2. Go over your completed study guide papers with your parent/guardian.

Writing

  1. Write a Response to Literature for this section of The Scarlet Letter. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  2. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Day 11

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: pentameter, hexameter, persona, conceit

Reading

  1. Read about Edward Taylor.
  2. Taylor’s writing often focused on self-examination, which was important to later generation Puritans attempting to understand their relationship to God.
  3. Edward Taylor was considered the “American Metaphysical Poet”. Read about the Metaphysical poets.
  4. Read “Huswifery”.
  5. Taylor uses a central conceit (an extended metaphor that may be stretching reality) in this poem. Can you identify it?
  6. Outside Reading Assignment: For this week, read Chapters 16-24 of The Scarlet Letter. Complete pages 13-17 of your study guide. You should expect to be done this assignment by Day 15. Day 15’s Reading portion of your class will go over this assignment. (When assignments tell you to discuss in your small group, instead discuss the issues with a parent or other adult in your household.)

Writing

  1. As you begin to process your ideas for your reflective essay, be prepared to examine your beliefs, values, attitudes and assumptions. Consider how and why you think the way you do about this topic. Let those hows and whys help you form what you would like to share in your paper.
  2. Use descriptive language to show that you have thought critically about the topic. You are writing about yourself, your ideas, and your opinions. Unlike other academic writing, using first person pronouns are allowed in these types of essays. You can be creative in your writing, but be sure the creative aspects don’t overshadow the message you are trying to convey. If you’re writing about something serious, keep the tone of your writing consistent with that.

Day 12

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: tone, voice, symbolism

Reading

  1. Read the overview of American Literature (click on the tab “American Literature, 1700-1820).
  2. What are the major differences between The Enlightenment and The Great Awakening? Add these to your notes.
  3. Read about Jonathan Edwards.
  4. Read Jonathan Edwards’ sermon “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” (Here is an audio version of the sermon.)
  5. Consider your prior knowledge of Puritan life and belief systems. In what ways does Edwards’ sermon model Puritan beliefs?
  6. What are the prominent themes communicated by the images and analogies that Edwards uses?
  7. This sermon is illustrating the biblical concept of sin being a great grievance against God that must be punished. There is a turning point in this sermon which begins with, “And now you have an extraordinary opportunity, a day where Christ has thrown the door of mercy wide open, and stands calling. . .” We can look at this sermon for the religious teaching that it was, but we can also examine it for the literary piece that it was.
  8. How does Edwards use rhetorical elements in the sermon?
  9. Read through these rhetorical devices and examples from the text. Take notes.
  10. Take the Reading Comprehension quiz for “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”. Choose 5 questions. Record your grade out of 4 instead of 5. This gives you a potential for extra credit.

Day 13

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: aphorism, autobiography, blank verse

Reading

  1. Read about Benjamin Franklin, the writer.
  2. Read pages 10-12 and pages 38-39 of The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.
  3. How does Franklin feel about human nature? How does he feel about education? Do you agree or disagree with his views?
  4. Which virtue on Franklin’s list do you believe is the most important? Which one would you say is the least important? Why?
  5. When we read an autobiography, we should ask ourselves if the writer is being objective with how he presents himself or if he’s actually creating a character and idealized version of himself.  If you were writing an autobiography, are there things about yourself that you would want to leave out?
  6. Read about Benjamin Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Almanac in the article, “The Prominent and Prodigiously Popular Poor Richard”.
  7. Read over Benjamin Franklin’s aphorisms and the virtues associated with them.
  8. Choose 3 aphorisms from the list that you like. Write down the meaning of each aphorism and categorize it by whether it is a moral lesson, an implied metaphor, or just a funny comment on life.

Writing

  1. Read over the article Reflective Writing: a basic introduction.
  2. Take notes to help you in your essay planning.

Day 14

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: balanced sentence, rhetorical question, imagery

Reading

  1. Read about Patrick Henry.
  2. Read Patrick Henry’s “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech.
  3. Write a paragraph responding to Henry’s speech. How did it make you feel? What made his arguments powerful? How did he appeal to logic? How did he appeal to emotion?
  4. How does Henry use rhetorical questions in his speech?
  5. What Biblical and mythological allusions does Henry make in his speech? How would each allusion relate to what was happening in 1775? You may look these up to help you answer.
    1. “We are apt to . . . listen to the song of that siren, till she transforms us into beasts.” (Odyssey, Books 10 and 12)
    2. “Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation?” (Ezekiel 12:2)
    3. “Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss.” (Luke 22:47-48)
  6. Read about Thomas Paine.
  7. Read the summary of Common Sense.
  8. Read The Crisis by Thomas Paine (just the first page is needed).
  9. What emotions does Paine appeal to? List a few examples of where Paine makes appeals.
  10. Persuasive writers uses metaphors and analogies in their arguments. Paine uses an analogy connecting the King of Britain with a thief. What point is he trying to make using this analogy?

Writing

  1. Writing a reflective essay will be similar to how you would write a narrative essay. You will include elements of a narrative: plot, characters, setting, conflict. A common structure for a reflective essay is Introduction, Body, and Conclusion. The event, any main characters, and the setting will all be “introduced” within your introduction.
  2. Introductions do not need to be longer than one paragraph. Give your purpose of your paper, but don’t give too much detail in the introduction. The details should be saved for the body of the paper. Your introduction is just a preview of what is to come in your paper.

Day 15

Unit: The Romantic Period (1830-1870)

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: point of view, prose, colloquialism

Reading

  1. Just in time for us to begin discussing the Romantic Period in American Literature, today you should be done The Scarlet Letter as well as pages 13-17 of the study guide.
  2. Go over your completed study guide papers with your parent/guardian.
  3. Take the quiz for The Scarlet Letter. Record your grade out of 24 instead of 25. This gives you the potential for extra credit.

Writing

  1. Write a Response to Literature for the final portion or a response to the entirety of The Scarlet Letter. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  2. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Day 16

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: allegory, free verse, anaphora

Reading

  1. Read “Making Connections” for the “Beginnings to 1820”.
  2. Read the “Overview for 1820-1865”.
  3. Read more about Nathaniel Hawthorne.
  4. We are going to read the short story, Young Goodman Brown. Print off page 18 of your study guide to complete alongside of your reading.
  5. Before you read the story, read this article in the Commending the Classics series, discussing the literary conventions and context.
  6. Read Young Goodman Brown.
  7. Read the follow up to the Commending the Classics article, discussing the substance and style of the book.
    Use the discussion questions at the end of the article to write a Response to Literature. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Writing

  1. The body of your reflective essay is where it is most like a narrative. You are recreating an event and giving specific details. Your job here is to make it clear to the reader the reasons this event is significant.
  2. Your event should be well developed. It may be a series of events or incidents that you’ll need to describe effectively. Give background information that is relevant. Be sure your events are organized clearly. If you are using chronological order, make sure that is known. You can also incorporate flashbacks, but you’ll need to be careful that this is not confusing to the reader. Keep a consistent point of view.
  3. It is important that you remember enough about the situation or event to be able to write about it and to maintain interest in it (both for yourself and the reader).

Day 17

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: genre, character foils, novel

Reading

  1. Read about The Romantic Period in Literature.
  2. Read A Brief Guide to the Fireside Poets.
  3. Read about William Cullen Bryant.
  4. Read “Thanatopsis” (1821).
  5. What event is being described in lines 8-17? (answer: death)
  6. Who is the speaker in lines 18-72? (answer: Nature)
  7. What human fear is being discussed in lines 58-60? (answer: the fear of dying alone)
  8. What is the poem’s answer to that fear? (answer: Eventually everyone dies, so we are not alone in the experience.)
  9. How does the author say we should approach death (lines 73-81)? (answer: with trust and a sense of comfort)
  10. Romanticism was a movement which centered around imagination and emotion being more important than reason and formal rules. Also, where previously one was secure in the belief that God was in control, Romanticism looks more to Nature as a divine force. How does this piece fit those ideas? (answer: Emotion is being used to take away a fear of death. We should find solace in being emotionally connected with others who die. Nature is the great comforter here. Nature welcomes us in death (the elements of nature decorating the tomb)).
  11. Read about Oliver Wendell Holmes.
  12. Read “Old Ironsides”.
  13. What is the alternative proposed in the poem for Old Ironsides? (answer: sink the ship)

Writing

  1. Continue working on your Reflective Essay.

Day 18

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: satire, inversion, figure of speech

Reading

  1. Read about Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
  2. Read “The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls”.
  3. What is “The Tide Rises, the Tide falls” about? (answer: All traces of human existence are erased by time.)
  4. Read “A Psalm of Life”.
  5. What does “Psalm of Life” encourage people to do? (answer: seize the day, live a life that will serve as an example for the future)
  6. Read about James Russell Lowell.
  7. Read Stanzas on Freedom.

Day 19

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: paraphrase, conflict, dialogue

Reading

  1. Read about Transcendentalism.
  2. Read about Ralph W. Emerson.
  3. Read from Nature (1836). Read the Introduction and Chapters 1-3.
  4. Emerson writes that there are ways the woods can change a man. Man can find truth in solitude and in nature. Man has the ability to enjoy perfect exhilaration. Man can cast off years. Man can return to reason and faith.
  5. What do you think it means to say “Nature always wears the colors of the spirit”? (answer: Our feelings determine how we look at nature.)
  6. Read from Self-Reliance (1830).
  7. One characteristic of Transcendentalism was that individuals should trust their own instinct, insight, and intuition when making important decisions. What problems do you see with this idea?
  8. Moral relativism is a theme in “Self-Reliance”. We should “look inward for truth”. Do you think morals are dependent upon a situation and are relative to an individual? Or do you think morals are more definite than that? Is there an absolute wrong and right?

Writing

  1. Look over the rubric for your Reflection Essay and compare what you have for your essay to the rubric expectations. How well are you doing? Where could you improve? Make changes as needed.

Day 20*

Vocabulary*

  1.  *Take Vocabulary Quiz #2. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21, not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: dialect, static character, dynamic character

Writing

  1. Remember that your Reflective Essay is due on Day 30.
  2. As part of your essay writing,when you turn in your essay include a self-evaluation addressing the following questions:
    1. Did you stick with your original topic or did you change it along the way? Why?
    2. What problems did you encounter during the process of creating the essay?
    3. List two of the most important changes you made. Why did you make them?
    4. What part of your essay makes you the most proud? Why?

Day 21

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: ironyprotagonist, antagonist

Reading

  1. Read about Henry David Thoreau.
  2. Read Chapter 5 “Solitude” from Walden (1854).
  3. “I experienced sometimes that the most sweet and tender, the most innocent and encouraging society may be found in any natural object, even for the poor misanthrope and most melancholy man. There can be no very black melancholy to him who lives in the midst of nature.” How does this quote fit with the characteristics of Transcendentalism?
  4. Find two other quotes capturing themes that are fitting. Write down why they are appropriate choices.

Writing

  1. Read about Rhetorical Strategies writers use. Think about how some authors we have been studying use these strategies.
  2. Continue working on your essay due on Day 30.

Day 22

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: external conflict, internal conflict, characterization

Reading

  1. Read about Henry David Thoreau’s work, Civil Disobedience.
  2. Read this excerpt (Sections 1-13) of Civil Disobedience.
  3. Write a Response to Literature where you complete the following:
    1. Describe the historical background and reason why Thoreau wrote Civil Disobedience.
    2. What relevance does “Civil Disobedience” have for today’s audience?
  4. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  5. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Day 23

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: comic relief, theme, plot

Reading

  1. Read about American Renaissance & American Romanticism: The Gothic.
  2. Read about Washington Irving.
  3. Read The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
  4. Write a Response to Literature using each of the following questions as a guide:
    1. What types of conflict (physical, moral, intellectual, or emotional) do you see?
    2. How does Irving reveal character in “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”?
    3. Discuss some of the symbols in “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.”
    4. What supernatural or surprising events are employed by Washington Irving? Are these happenings believable?
  5. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  6. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.
  7. Read Rip Van Winkle.
  8. Read over this study guide. Read each prompt and write a paragraph or two giving an answer. Include this in your Response to Literature journal, but don’t worry about grading it.

Day 24(*)

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: rising action, climax, falling action (look in the description for the definition of falling action)

Reading*

  1. Read about Edgar Allan Poe.
  2. Read The Fall of the House of Usher (1839).
  3. *Complete this worksheet activity, Poe and The Fall of the House of Usher. The second page is the answer key.

Day 25

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: setting, motif, onomatopoeia

Day 26(*)

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: atmosphere, refrain, epic

Reading*

  1. Read The Raven (1845).
  2. Read Poe’s own explanation of his choices in The Raven by reading his article, “The Philosophy of Composition”.
  3. Read The Tell-Tale Heart (1903).
  4. Write a Response to Literature for The Tell-Tale Heart using this The Tell Tale Heart Worksheet.
  5. Read Annabel Lee (1903)
  6. *Complete the worksheet “Annabel Lee: Lost Love.” The key is on the second page.

Day 27

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: tragedy, tragic flaw, monologue

Reading

  1. Read about Herman Melville.
  2. Read about Moby Dick (1846). We are not going to have time to read the whole novel, but you should familiarize yourself with this novel.
  3. Read about Moby Dick as a great American novel.
  4. Read an analysis of major characters.
  5. Read about themes, motifs, and symbols.

Day 28

Poetry Unit

Reading/Vocabulary

  1. Today we will be starting a poetry unit which will take us through the rest of this grading period.(Continue working on your outside reading as assigned and your Reflective Essay due on Day 30.) When you see a definition or a link to a definition, record it as you were your previous vocabulary words. Sometimes they will repeat from earlier in the course. Make sure you know them well enough to identify them in use.
  2. We will be exploring several different styles of poetry, reviewing/learning literary terms specific to poetry, explicating poetry, and writing some original poetry.
  3. Read the definition of a poem.
  4. Read the definition of prosody.
  5. Review the difference between Poetry and Prose.
  6. When we examine writing of any kind, we need to keep in mind the author’s intentional use of literary elements and language to cause some sort of connection to the audience.
  7. In thinking about poetry, keep in mind that the form (structure) and the content of the poem contribute to the overall meaning of the poem. The form and the content also play a part in creating that desired effect on the reader. Everything has a purpose. This is important to remember as you read an author’s work and as you create your own.

Writing

  1. On Day 45, you will have a Poetry Explication Essay due. Your essay should be 2-3 pages in length. You should choose a poem we have not discussed in class. We will be talking about Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson soon. There are many poems by those two authors that would work well for this assignment. Or you might choose to revisit earlier authors (Transcendentalists, Romanticists). Remember to choose an American author from a time period we have covered so far.
  2. Use the poetry terms we have discussed in class as well as your own insight while reading the poem. A well-written explication will give the reader an idea of the literal meaning of the poem and also an analysis of its poetic devices. Include a copy of the poem you choose with your assignment.
  3. Read this handout about Poetry Explication.
  4. Use this Poetry Explication Rubric for grading.
  5. While writing your paper continue to refer to the MLA Formatting and Style Guide.

Day 29(*)

Reminder: Your Reflective Essay is due tomorrow.

Reading/Vocabulary*

  1. Let’s explore some of the major elements of poetry. Some of these may overlap a bit in our discussion.
  2. Figurative language (and its figures of speech) can include similes, metaphors, personification, hyperbole, and cliche. The writer uses figurative language to describe something by comparing it with something else.
  3. Imagery can be defined using our five senses. A visual image can be created, but other senses can be appealed to by a writer’s use of language as well. Lots of details and specific word choice are important for creating the exact image the reader should have in his or her mind while reading the text. Imagery often uses symbolism.
  4. *Complete this Figurative Language Worksheet.

Day 30(*)

ESSAY DUE

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #3. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.

Writing

  1. Your Reflective Essay is due today. Essays are to be 500-700 words long.  Here is the Reflective Essay Rubric you will be using to grade this essay. Follow the directions on the rubric and record your score.

Day 31(*)

Reading/Vocabulary*

  1. Sound devices are another element of poetry. There are many ways sound devices can be used in poetry. Let’s review alliterationonomatopoeia, assonance, and consonance.
  2. *Complete the Sound Devices worksheet. (answers: 1. assonance 2. alliteration 3.consonance 4.alliteration 5.assonance 6.assonance 7. assonance 8. consonance 9.assonance 10.assonance)

Writing

  1. The Introduction for your Poetry Explication analysis should begin with a “hook”. This could be a question, a quote, a metaphor, or something else that catches the attention of your reader. Include a few sentences of background information in your introduction that connects the hook to your thesis. Background information should is important to the reader’s understanding of your message. The title and poet of your poem as well as a some information about where/when/why the poem was written. Your thesis sentence should state the interpretation of the poem’s meaning. A strong thesis will state your interpretation with confidence.

Day 32(*)

Reading/Vocabulary

  1. Let’s look over some types of rhyme:  internal rhyme, slant/half rhyme, eye/sight rhyme
  2. Read about different types of rhyme.

Writing*

  1. The body of your essay will consist of several paragraphs. Your analysis should be done through a method known as SOAPSTONE.
  2. *Print the SOAPSTONE notes. Use this handout as you work on your poetry essay.

Day 33

Reading

  1. Read the Academy of American Poets article How To Read A Poem.
  2. Read The Writer’s Handbook article How To Read A Poem.

Writing

  1. One option for organizing information within the body of your essay also uses an acronym approach like SOAPSTONE.
  2. Read about MEAL plan.
  3. Another option’s acronym is TIQA. It stands for:
    1. T: topic sentence
    2. I: introduce the quote by discussing the context of the quote
    3. Q: quote (Give the quote itself.)
    4. A: analysis (Explain the importance of the quote and link it back to the topic sentence.
    5. You may choose to repeat TIQA in the same paragraph. If you do this, the second T will stand for Transition. Use a sentence to transition from your first topic to your second topic. Keep it flowing naturally.

Day 34(**)

Reading/Writing**

  1. Read about Walt Whitman.
  2. We will be using an adaptation of a Read, Write, Think lesson plan. (The original can be found here.)
  3. Read Walt Whitman’s poem, “I Hear America Singing”.
  4. This is a list poem (or a catalog verse). It is “a poem comprised of a list of persons, places, things, or abstract ideas which share a common denominator”.
  5. You will be writing a similar poem, but the topic will be about either your family/home or your community. You may also decide you want to write this about your church, a youth group, a homeschool co-op, or some other type of group like that.
  6. *Print the worksheet Model Poem and look it over. Do not start working on it yet.
  7. Whitman does not use specific names of people, but instead he uses occupations or their roles. Do the same with your poem.
  8. *Fill out the Planning Sheet. (Ignore the use of “School”.) Use whatever your personal selection was to complete the planning sheet. Once you’ve finished your planning sheet, use it to as you fill in the blanks on your Model Poem worksheet.
  9. Use your “Model Poem” sheet and begin filling that out. You are going to be filling the blanks with people and their roles in your chosen selection. You should circle the correct pronoun choices for the names that they use in the blanks on the handout. You will complete your poem tomorrow.

Day 35

Reading/Writing

  1. Read your poem to someone. Have them list some of the groups you mention in your poem.
  2. Whitman was actually criticized for his poem “I Hear America Singing”, because he seemed to exclude groups of people.
  3. Years later, Langston Hughes would write a poem responding to Whitman’s. Read “I, Too, Sing America”. What do you think about the criticisms Hughes points out within Whitman’s poem?
  4. Think about your poem now. Are there any groups that you may have left out in your poem? Why do you think that omission may have happened?

Day 36

Reading

  1. Read Purdue Owl’s article Writing About Poetry.
  2. Read this sample explication of Walt Whitman’s poem, “A Noiseless Patient Spider”.

Writing

  1. Continue working on your poetry paper.

Day 37

Reading

  1. Read about Emily Dickinson.
  2. Read Tips for Reading Dickinson’s Poetry.
  3. Read Major Characteristics of Dickinson’s Poetry.
  4. Read  “I heard a Fly buzz—when I died”.
  5. Complete this worksheet on “I heard a Fly buzz-when I died”.

Day 38

Reading

  1. Read “The Soul selects her own Society”.
  2. Read “Hope is the thing with feathers”.
  3. Read “I measure every Grief I meet”.

Writing

  1. Complete the Poetry Analysis Worksheet for one of the poems we read today.
  2. Use this study guide and compare what you came up with when you are done.

Day 39

Reading

  1. Read about Harriet Beecher Stowe.
  2. Read about Harriet Beecher Stowe in the article, Harriet Beecher Stowe & “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”: Changing History with a Best-Seller.
  3. Explain to someone why Uncle Tom’s Cabin was such an important work.

Day 40

Reading

  1. Read about The Slave Narrative.
  2. Read about Frederick Douglass.
  3. Read the plot overview of The Narrative of Frederick Douglass.
  4. Read about the themes of The Narrative of Frederick Douglass.

Writing

  1. Continue working on your poetry essay. Remember it is due on Day 45.

Day 41

Reading

  1. Watch the lecture, “How the Civil War Transformed American Literature”. If you prefer, you can read the transcript instead. This professor is talking about teaching this information, but the lecture contains valuable information for you.

Day 42(**)

Reading**

  1. Read the article “A ‘Poetry-Fueled War'”.
  2. Read about Frances Ellen Watkins Harper.
  3. Read “Learning to Read”.
  4. *Complete the annotation worksheet for “Learning to Read”. It is found on this resources page and listed as Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s “Learning to Read”: “Learning to Read” Student Version.
  5. To better help in your understanding, note that verses 1–2/13–20 refer to the period immediately after Slavery. This is also known as the era of Reconstruction. Verses 3–12 refer to the period during Slavery.
  6. Read about how some states made it illegal to teach a slave how to read and write.
  7. Use the annotation worksheet Teacher Version to see how well you did in your annotation. It is found on this resources page and listed as Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s “Learning to Read”: Annotated Teacher Version.

Day 43

Reading

  1. Read about Louisa May Alcott.
  2. Read the plot overview of Little Women.
  3. Read about the themes of Little Women.

Day 44

Reading

  1. In preparation for tomorrow’s exam, review this Timeline to see what was going on in the nation during this literary time.
  2. Listen to Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address speech.

Writing

  1. Give your Poetry Explication essay a final proofread and compare it to the rubric’s requirements. Be prepared to turn it in tomorrow.

Day 45

  1. Your Poetry Explication Essay is due. Your essay should be 2-3 pages in length. Use this Poetry Explication Rubric and record the grade.
  2. Print off your Quarter 1 Exam and complete it.
  3. Review the Quarter 1 Exam Answer Key and record your Exam grade out of 30.

Day 46(*)

Second Quarter

Unit: The Period of Realism and Naturalism (1870-1910)

  1. (*)Print out your grading sheet for the second quarter or use the grades-for-american-literature-2nd-quarter.

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: regionalism/local-color fiction, sentimentality/sentimentalism, elegy

Reading

  1. Read an overview of American Literature from 1865-1914.
  2. Take notes on what was significant about Naturalism and Realism.
  3. Outside Reading Assignment: Over the next 3 weeks of this course, you will read Stephen Crane’s novel, The Red Badge of Courage, in addition to the reading assignments I will list on each day’s work. For this week, you will read Chapters 1-7 of The Red Badge of Courage and complete pages 1-8 of this The Red Badge of Courage Study Guide. Today you will receive a reading assignment and a related work assignment. The reading and assignment should be completed by Day 50. You can decide how much you want to read each day to stay on schedule. The outside reading should NOT be considered optional. You will be tested on this material within this course and it will be literature you should know about for the American Literature CLEP.

Writing

  1. You will be writing a Rhetorical Analysis essay this quarter. It will be due on Day 61. You will choose a piece of American nonfiction prose, particularly an essay or a speech. This should be a focused analysis of the writing. It is not supposed to be a summary or a personal critique. Use standard MLA format. The essay must be double-spaced, with one-inch margins all around. Please use a 12-point, Times New Roman font. Give your essay a creative title. It should be 2-3 pages long. Your essay will be graded using this Rhetorical Analysis Essay Rubric.
  2. Watch the Purdue OWL: Introduction to Rhetoric video.

Day 47

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: rhetoricforeshadowing

Reading

  1. Read about Mark Twain.
  2. Mark Twain is considered a Realist author and is especially known for writing local-color narratives (regionalism).
  3. Read a summary of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. We will not have time to read this in this course, but it is an important novel to know.
  4. Read about The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and its controversy.
  5. Read about the themes of the novel

Writing

  1. When you have chosen the rhetorical piece you would like to write your essay on, you should examine the historical context and the origin for your piece. What was going on in the nation at the time of this piece? How might that have fueled this piece being delivered? If this was a speech, when and where was it given? What is the significant of its time and location?
  2. Read about Elements of Rhetorical Situations.

Day 48

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: frame narrative or frame tale, folk tale

Reading

  1. Read The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.
  2. Let’s examine the structure of this story. This is a frame narrative. The narrator retells a story he heard from a bartender, Simon Wheeler, about a gambler, Jim Smiley. The narrator tells his story in a first person point of view. The story within the story is in third-person and told by Simon Wheeler.
  3. When the story was first released, James Russell Lowell called it, “the finest piece of humorous literature yet produced in America.” Who is the target of the humor in this story? (answer: Smiley, the narrator who was told by someone to seek out Simon Wheeler)
  4. Dialect is a common tool used in regionalism literature. Is the dialect a help in this story? What does it do for the setting and for characterization? What does it do for the plot development and the narration?
  5. How does this story fall into the category of Realism? Use specifics from the text to answer this.
  6. Read How to Tell A Story (Read through “The Wounded Soldier” and “The Golden Arm”then stop.)
  7. What is the tone of this essay? (answer: humorous. . .It is satire.)
  8. What does Twain think is the reason writers go to such great lengths in their storytelling? (answer: They want to be the center of attention and want to get a better reaction from their audience. They will choose to manipulate details to make them more interesting. They will repeat punch lines of jokes until they are no longer funny.)

Writing

  1. Look over your choice for your Rhetorical Analysis Essay. Think about our earlier discussions of SOAPSTONE (Day 32). What is the Speaker, Occasion, and Subject? What can you say about the speaker? Your paper should include their credentials. Is this an essay or speech by a president, a general, a head of an organization, etc.? Be sure to choose appropriate research methods and cite your sources correctly.
  2. What is the Purpose? What is the speaker trying to impress upon their audience? Use words to describe what the writer wants the audience to do or to think.
  3. Who is the Audience? When was this essay or speech delivered? To what group of people was it delivered?
  4. What is the Tone? Think of adjective(s) describing the attitude/feeling conveyed by the writer.
  5. Read about Aristotle’s Rhetorical Situations.

Day 49

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: dramatic irony, situational irony, verbal irony (Read through the link to find each definition.)

Reading

  1. Read about Ambrose Bierce.
  2. Read An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge. Here’s an audio book version.
  3. How does Bierce fit into Realism or Naturalism with this piece? Most critics say Bierce cannot be pinned down to a literary category. We’re going to consider him a Naturalist for this course.
  4. Write a Response to Literature about how Bierce uses symbolism, suspense, and imagery in this story. Some specific things to discuss are the author’s use of time and foreshadowing. He uses the chronology of the story almost like a movie with a flashback and foreshadowing. Where are some specific places he does this? Discuss the imagery of the sluggish stream and the dancing driftwood.

Writing

  1. Rhetorical Analysis Essay – How would you characterize the style of the piece you are analyzing? Review the different types of style here.
  2. Read about Text in The Rhetorical Situation.

Day 50

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: determinism, epigramunderstatement

Reading

  1. Today you should be done Chapters 1-7 of The Red Badge of Courage as well as pages 1-8 of the study guide.
  2. Go over your completed study guide papers with your parent/guardian.

Writing

  1. When writing your analysis, you should work chronologically through the text. You start at the beginning of the text and work your way through it. Discuss what the writer is saying and how effective the strategies he/she is using as you move through the text.
  2. Depending on how long the text is and how it is organized you may be discussing paragraph by paragraph. Or it may be best to discuss the text in terms of sections with a beginning, middle, and end. Be sure to use proper transition words to demonstrate movement through the text and to clearly identify which portion you are discussing at that moment.
  3. Read about Author and Audience in The Rhetorical Situation.

Day 51

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: inferencemood, juxtapose

Reading

  1. Read about Jack London.
  2. Read about The Call of the Wild.
  3. Read about themes and symbols.
  4. Outside Reading Assignment: For this week, read Chapters 8-16 of The Red Badge of Courage. Complete pages 9-12 of your The Red Badge of Courage Study Guide. You should expect to be done this assignment by Day 55. Day 55’s Reading portion of your class will go over this assignment. (When assignments tell you to discuss in your small group, instead discuss the issues with a parent or other adult in your household.)

Writing

  1. Your Rhetorical Analysis Essay should identify the author/speaker’s strongest use of rhetorical strategies as you discuss each section. Use specific examples from the text in proper format. You do not have to try to include every strategy the author/speaker uses. Simply choose the strongest ones, the ones that are most effective.
  2. Read about Setting in The Rhetorical Situation.

Day 52

Reading

  1. Read over the description of Naturalism. Write down the themes found on the Naturalism link. (These are Charles Child Walcutt’s common themes of naturalism as noted in his American Literary Naturalism: A Divided Stream.)
  2. Read To Build A Fire.
  3. Take notes of 1 or 2 examples of where you see some of the the common themes of naturalism in the story. An example of nature being indifferent could be the passage that states, “It did not lead him to meditate upon his frailty as a creature of temperature, and upon man’s frailty in general.”
  4. Can you think of ways in which the protagonist could have changed the course of events?
  5. How does the way the author describes the dog’s reactions create a feeling of suspense for the reader?

Writing

  1. To keep your paper as analysis rather than summary, be sure to use strong verbs when discussing the writer’s rhetorical choices. Some verbs are considered weak as their use is often for a summary. Weak verbs could include: says, relates, goes on to say, tells, this quote shows, explains, states, and shows.
  2. Stronger verbs useful for analysis may include: implies, trivializes, qualifies, describes, suggests, dismisses, analyzes, questions, compares, vilifies, praises, supports, contrasts, emphasizes, establishes, admonishes, argues, defines, ridicules, minimizes, etc.
  3. When looking for a strong verb to use, think of what would be a stronger alternative for the word “shows”.
  4. Read Example 1 in The Rhetorical Situation.

Day 53(*)

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: objective point of view, third- person limited point of view, third-person omniscient (Read through the link to find each definition.)

Reading*

  1. Read about Stephen Crane.
  2. Read “Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind”.
  3. How does Crane use irony to show that war is far from kind?
  4. *Between today and tomorrow read all of  The Open Boat. It is 7 chapters long. For each of the chapters print off and complete the Student Activity Sheets to create a study guide for yourself.

Writing

  1. An important part of rhetorical analysis will include analyzing diction.
  2. Look for the speaker’s use of specific words or phrases which may appear to be stronger than others. When the speaker chose a stronger alternative to a word instead of a simpler choice, you should pay attention to it.
  3. Notice patterns (such as repetition) used by the writer. Does the pattern show emotion or emphasis?
  4. The author should use words that are purposeful with a meaning that is the exact meaning intended. Words can have an effect on the reader, so they must be chosen carefully.
  5. Read Example 2 in The Rhetorical Situation.

Day 54

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: stream of consciousness, pessimism, urbanization

Reading

  1. Finish The Open Boat including any Student Activity Sheets for the remaining chapters.
  2. Write a Response to Literature using your completed Student Activity Sheets to guide you. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Writing

  1. Diction will reflect the subject, purpose, occasion, and audience.
  2. The subject, occasion, and audience will determine how detailed or how informal/formal the diction needs to be.
  3. The writer’s purpose may be to inform, to persuade, or to entertain. This will influence the diction. If the purpose is to inform, then the diction may be more to the point. If the purpose is to entertain, there may be words used with irony or humorous ways.
  4. Read Example 3 in The Rhetorical Situation.

Day 55

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #4. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: industrializationdetachment, syntax

Reading

  1. Today you should be done Chapters 8-16 of The Red Badge of Courage as well as pages 9-12 of the study guide.
  2. Go over your completed study guide papers with your parent/guardian.

Writing

  1. An important part of rhetorical analysis will include analyzing syntax.
  2. Review the definition of syntax.
  3. Sentence length is one part of syntax. It is important to vary your sentence length. A shorter sentence can show that the message is very straightforward. A longer sentence can be more detailed and descriptive.
  4. Read Sentence Variety: Strategies for Variation.
  5. Sentence type is another aspect of syntax.
  6. Read Sentence Variety: Sentence Types.
  7. A third aspect of syntax is punctuation. Again a variety of punctuation is used in good writing.
  8. A colon (:) can direct the reader to a focal point of the sentence. It shows the reader that something following the colon is important.
  9. A semi-colon (;) can show the reader that both of the two independent clauses have equal importance or it can emphasize parallel ideas.
  10. A dash (-) can show a quick change in thought or tone. It could also be used to give a brief summary.
  11. Read Conclusion in The Rhetorical Situation.

Day 56

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: pragmatismapathy

Reading

  1. Over the next few days we are going to be looking at some letters and speeches from the Native American experience and the fight for equality taking place after the Civil War.
  2. Read about Cochise.
  3. Read I am alone (I am the last of my family.)
  4. What is the main idea of this speech? (answer: The small number of remaining Apaches deserve an area of land where they can live peacefully alongside the white men. The Apaches have had their tribesmen destroyed by the Americans and the Apaches are descendants of the original inhabitants of this land. In order to preserve their people, they need this chance.)
  5. How was the relationship between the Americans and the Apaches initially? (answer: There was a friendship and peace between them in the same land.)
  6. What happened to the relationship?(answer: The passage says that the Americans caused “a very great wrong”. )
  7. Read about Chief Joseph.
  8. Read The Surrender of Chief Joseph (I Will Fight No More Forever).
  9. What seems to be Chief Joseph’s reason for not wanting to fight? (answer: the futility of fighting and the suffering of his people)
  10. What tone does this speech have? (answer: sad, but dignified)
  11. Outside Reading Assignment:For this week, read Chapters 17-24 of The Red Badge of Courage. Complete pages 13-17 of your The Red Badge of Courage Study Guide. You should expect to be done this assignment by Day 60. Day 60’s Reading portion of your class will go over this assignment. (When assignments tell you to discuss in your small group, instead discuss the issues with a parent or other adult in your household.)

Writing

  1. Another important part of rhetorical analysis will include analyzing tone.
  2. Review the definition of tone.
  3. Tone is created by the writer’s use of other rhetorical strategies (diction, tropes, syntax, schemes, details).
  4. How does the author’s use of words, imagery, or details reveal the author’s attitude toward an event or the topic in the essay/speech?
  5. What words best describe the author’s attitude toward this subject or event?

Reminder: Your Rhetorical Analysis Essay is due on Day 61.

Day 57

Reading

  1. Read about Sojourner Truth.
  2. Read Ain’t I A Woman?
  3. List the major points that Sojourner Truth is making in this speech.
  4. What allusions does she make?
  5. What can you learn about her from this speech?
  6. In what ways does Sojourner appeal to the emotions of her audience?

Writing

  1. Continue working on your essay. Proofread it for any grammatical or spelling errors.

Day 58

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: digression, flashback, dramatic monologue, vernacular,

Reading

  1. Read about Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
  2. Read her speech “Solitude of Self”.
  3. Stanton uses allusion in her speech. What Shakespeare reference does she make? (answer: 1) Shakespeare’s “Titus Andronicus” In this play a young girl was supposed to try to “call for water and wash her hands” after her tongue and hands were cut off. The allusion implies that women are in the same situation of being expected to be perfect, but are not given the same education and opportunities which men have.)
  4. What is Stanton referring to when she says, “Conceding then that the responsibilities of life rest equally on man and woman, that their destiny is the same, they need the same preparation for time and eternity”? (answer: individual responsibility for both men and women, self-sovereignty for males and females)
  5. Read about Susan B. Anthony.
  6. Read her speech “Is it a Crime For A Citizen of the United States to Vote?”
  7. What is the major point Susan B. Anthony makes in her reference to the Declaration of Independence? (answer: One of the central ideas of the speech is that government cannot gift rights and therefore cannot take them away. Anthony has to go beyond the letter of the Declaration to the spirit behind it to substitute for “men” the meaning “men and women.” “Rights” are something people are born with; they are “God-given.” Anthony points out that she has always had the right to vote. She was born with that right whether the government “gave” it to her or not.)

Day 59

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: catharsisexistentialism

Reading

  1. Read about Kate Chopin.
  2. Read “The Story of An Hour”.
  3. Why do you think the author mentions in the first paragraph that Mrs. Mallard had “heart trouble”?
  4. The setting of the story is limited to a room, a staircase, and a front door. How does this confinement emphasize the themes of the story?
  5. In what ways is this passage significant? “She could see in the open square before her house the tops of trees that were all aquiver with the new spring life. The delicious breath of rain was in the air. In the street below a peddler was crying his wares. The notes of a distant song which some one was singing reached her faintly, and countless sparrows were twittering in the eaves.”
  6. Read about The Awakening.
  7. Read about the themes and symbols.

Day 60

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: tragedy (Greek vs. English), hubris, verisimilitude

Reading

  1. Today you should be done The Red Badge of Courage as well as pages 13-17 of the The Red Badge of Courage Study Guide.
  2. Go over your completed study guide papers with your parent/guardian.
  3. Take the quiz for The Red Badge of Courage. Record your grade out of 24 instead of 25. This gives you the potential for extra credit.

Writing

  1. Write a Response to Literature for the The Red Badge of Courage. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  2. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.
  3. Remember your Rhetorical Analysis Essay is due tomorrow.

Day 61

Rhetorical Analysis Essay due today

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: abstract, ad hominem, annotate

Reading

  1. Read about Edith Wharton.
  2. Read about The House of Mirth.

Writing

  1. Your Rhetorical Analysis Essay is now due. (From your original directions: This should be a focused analysis of the writing. It is not supposed to be a summary or a personal critique. Use standard MLA format. The essay must be double-spaced, with one-inch margins all around. Please use a 12-point, Times New Roman font. Give your essay a creative title. It should be 2-3 pages long.)  Grade your essay using this Rhetorical Analysis Essay Rubric. Record your grade out of 40.

Day 62

Unit: The Modernist Period (1910-1945)

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: caricature, concrete language (search for concrete on that page)

Reading*

  1. Read the Norton Anthology of American Literature Overview for 1914-1945.
  2. Read about Willa Cather.
  3. We are going to be reading My Ántonia (1918) by Willa Cather. Download the Study Guide available here. Read pages 1-4 of the document.
  4. *Print off pages 5-8 of the study guide to complete alongside the reading of Book 1. Complete page 5 before beginning to read the novel.
  5. Here is audio for the book if you’d like to use it.
  6. Read the Introduction and Chapters 1-3. Fill out anything you can on page 6 of your study guide for Introduction and Book 1.
  7. What kind of narrative does the introduction present for the reader? (answer: a “frame” narrative. . .a series of memories from Jim’s point of view)
  8. What does the introduction reveal to the reader about Jim? (answer: He can’t let go of his past. He is a romantic figure.)
  9. What are some ways the themes of “The Immigrant Experience” and “The Prairie” are introduced in these opening chapters?

Day 63

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: conundrum, deduction, didacticism

Reading

  1. Read Chapters 4-6.
  2. Is there anything additional you can record on page 6 of the study guide?
  3. Be sure to take notes as you read in order to complete page 7 & 8 of the study guide once you complete Book I of the novel.
  4. Jim and Ántonia have a common connection in their love of what? (answer: They have a connection to the prairie land, because of a mutual love for it.)
  5. In what ways are two worlds blending and not blending in these chapters? (answer: Mrs. Shimerda seems to have trouble with the ways of the “new world”. She’s not very happy about Ántonia’s reading lessons. Ántonia is excited to learn a new language and a new style of cooking, but she doesn’t want to lose or reject the traditions of the “old country.”Jim has been teaching Antonia about the prairie and life in America. Antonia teaches Jim about immigrant culture in the prairie. Jim is a little nervous and suspicious when it comes to immigrants. Antonia is helping him to give people a chance.)
  6. Krajiek is able to take advantage of the Shimerda’s due to what? (answer: He’s the only one who knows their language. As immigrants, the Shimerdas are isolated by language and culture.)

Day 64

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: discourse, dissonance

Reading

  1. Read Chapters 7-9.
  2. Is there anything additional you can record on page 6 of the study guide?
  3. Be sure to take notes as you read in order to complete page 7 & 8 of the study guide once you complete Book I of the novel.
  4. Jim struggles with wanting to prove himself as what? (answer: a strong, masculine man. . .He doesn’t like to show weakness or inferiority to Antonia because of his age or his level of courage.)
  5. What does Pavel and Peter’s situation highlight? (answer: They are being manipulated by Wick Cutter, just as the Shimerdas are subject to Krajiek’s exploitation. Peter and Pavel tried to escape their past and make a new life for themselves. In the end, Pavel dies and Peter has to start all over again. You can’t run from your past. It will always be a part of you.)

Day 65

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #5. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: epigraph, epistrophe, ethos/ethical appeal

Reading

  1. Read Chapters 10-12.
  2. Refer to your study guide for Book 1 and add any additional notes.
  3. Jim continues to learn more about this “melting pot” in America of the different immigrant cultures in the prairie land. Jim also appears to be more understanding of religious and cultural differences than his grandparents.
  4. The Shimerdas struggle a bit with their dependence upon the kindness and charity of the Burdens.

Day 66

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: euphemism, euphony, exposition

Reading

  1. Read Chapters 13-15.
  2. Refer to your study guide for Book 1 and add any additional notes.
  3. How does Jim’s grandmother show kindness to Mrs. Shimerda? (answer: Jim’s grandmother is kind to Mrs. Shimerda in giving her the pot. His grandmother has an understanding that Jim does not have due to his lack of experience and maturity.)
  4. How does Jim show a lack of understanding about immigrants? (answer: Jim makes a rude comment showing he doesn’t seem to fully understand why the immigrants would come to America.)
  5. In what way does Jim recognize a gender inequality issue? (answer: He is upset for Ántonia to not have the same opportunities as Ambrosch. Ántonia seems to realize this is just something she has to accept.)

Day 67

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: false analogy, generalization, interior monologue (look on page for definition)

Reading*

  1. Read Chapters 16-19.
  2. In this section there is a turning point where new life begins. What are some examples of this new life beginning? (answer: Spring, fires on the pastures for new grass to be planted, Shimerdas have a new log house, a new windmill and chicken-house, Antonia is growing up and changing, Jim is going to school and Antonia has a life of work)
  3. Jim often shows that he is nostalgic for the past. Antonia understands their lives are taking them on different paths.
  4. Complete the Book 1 portion of your study guide (pages 7 & 8).
  5. *Complete page 9 of the study guide “Before You Read” for Book 2 & 3.

Day 68

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: invective, jargon, (logical) fallacy

Reading*

  1. Read Book II Chapter 1-2
  2. Things are changing for Jim as his grandparents move to town, his friends (Otto and Jake) move out west.
  3. What makes the Harlings experience as immigrants different than Antonia’s family’s? (answer: The Harlings went through hardships and built a successful life for themselves. Frances has an independent nature.)
  4. *Print off page 10 of the study guide to use as you read Book II and Book III.

Day 69

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: metonymy, modality, moral

Reading

  1. Read Book II Chapters 3-5.
  2. Take notes on the differences between Antonia and Lena.

Day 70

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: negative-positive restatement (search on this page for the term), non sequitur, causal oversimplification (I don’t typically recommend Wikipedia for information, but this definition is needed.), trope

Reading

  1. Read Book II Chapters 6-8.
  2. Is there anything else you can add to page 10 of your Study Guide? Any notes you’d like to jot down for pages 11-12?

Day 71

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: parable, paradox, parody

Reading

  1. Read Book II Chapters 9-11.
  2. These chapters show that there is some thinking toward equality for the immigrants, but what story involving Lena shows there was still much prejudice toward them? (answer: Sylvester Lovett falls in love with Lena, but ultimately rejects her for someone he wouldn’t be embarrassed to marry.)
  3. What decision of Antonia’s concerns Jim? (answer: She quits working for the Harling family and goes to work for Wick Cutter.)

Day 72(*)

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: pathos, pedantic, persuasion

Reading

  1. Read Book II Chapters 12-15.
  2. Antonia is finding her independence. Jim wants to have more than a friendship with Antonia, but what does Antonia seem to realize even if Jim doesn’t see it? (answer: Their lives are taking different paths. Antonia must work. Jim will go on to pursue education. Their paths are dividing them.)
  3. In Chapter 15, Mr. Cutter has planned to attack Antonia. Jim protects her from this happening. Mr. Cutter beats Jim badly.

Day 73

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: polysyndeton, red herring, reductio ad absurdum

Reading

  1.  Read Book III Chapters 1-2.
  2. Who becomes Jim’s mentor at the university? (answer: Gaston Cleric, head of the Latin Department)
  3. In this new life of learning does Jim give up the people from his past? (answer: No, he always wanders back to them. He connects them to what he is now learning.)
  4. What does “optima dies .. . prima fugit” mean? (answer: In the lives of the mortals, the best days are the first to flee.)
  5. Who enters Jim’s life during the March of his sophomore year? (answer: Lena, who is now running her own business as a dressmaker.)
  6. What does Lena tell Jim about Antonia? (answer: Antonia is a housekeeper at the hotel working for Mrs. Gardener and she’s engaged.)

Day 74

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: sarcasm, straw man, subjectivity

Reading*

  1.  Read Book III Chapters 3-4.
  2. What does Lena tell Jim about her future? (answer: She doesn’t want to marry or have a family.)
  3. Why does Cleric want to take Jim back east? (answer: Cleric has been offered an instructorship at Harvard. He thinks Jim should go with him and continue his education at Harvard. He thinks Jim is wasting his time and future with Lena.)
  4. *Complete pages 11-13 of your study guide.

Day 75(**)

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #6. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: syllogism, synecdoche, thesis

Reading*

  1. Read Book IV Chapters 1-4.
  2. *Fill out what you can in your study guide pages 14-16.
  3. How old is Jim when he completes his studies at Harvard? (answer: 21)
  4. Why is Jim disappointed in Antonia? (answer: He was upset that Antonia had become someone to be pitied.)
  5. What has become of Lena? Tiny? (answer: Lena was “the leading dressmaker of Lincoln, much respected in Black Hawk”. Tiny had made a fortune with the Alaskan Gold Rush, but she seemed to be a cold person now.)
  6. What does Jim learn happened to Antonia? (answer: Her fiancee abandoned her when she was pregnant. He used Antonia for her dowry from Ambrosch and then left her.)
  7. How does Antonia react when she sees Jim? Where do they go to talk? (answer: She is happy to see him. She’s been waiting for him. They go to talk by Mr. Shimerda’s plot.)
  8. What career path has Jim chosen? (answer: law)
  9. What does Jim say Antonia means to him? (answer: He tells her she will always be a part of him.)
  10. Jim promises to return, but what does Antonia say if he does not return? (answer: Even if he doesn’t, he is still there for her just like her father still is.)

Day 76

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: adjourn, astute, censure

Reading

  1. Read Book V Chapters 1-3.
  2. *Fill out what you can in your study guide pages 14-16.
  3. Use page 17 as a guide to draft a Response to Literature for the novel. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Day 77

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: civilian, complicated, concur

Reading

  1. Read The Jazz Age or The Roaring Twenties: “The Lost Generation”.
  2. Read about F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  3. Read about The Great Gatsby (1925).
  4. Read the themes and symbols.
  5. Between today and tomorrow read the short story, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

Day 78

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: confirm, demolish, digress

Reading

  1. Finish reading the short story, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.
  2. Take notes where you answer the following questions:
    1. How does the story define identity and aging? Do you think those definitions are still relevant today? How does Benjamin’s aging in reverse help you understand the story and its characters?
    2. How does the author use the concept of beauty?
    3. In what ways would you call the story a social satire?
    4. Is this story funny, tragic, or both?

Day 79

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: dissent, equitable, exonerate

Reading

  1. Read about Ernest Hemingway.
  2. Read about A Farewell to Arms.
  3. Read the short story, Old Man At The Bridge.
  4. What was the old man concerned about? (answer: What happened to the animals he had to leave behind.)
  5. What is ironic about the old man’s concern and the storyteller’s concern? (answer: The old man seemed to be more concerned about the animals he abandoned, while the storyteller’s last lines seemed to show a lack of concern for the life of the old man.)

Day 80

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: extemporaneous, extricate, forfeit

Reading

  1. Read about Ezra Pound.
  2. What is his major contribution to this literary period?
  3. Read The River-Merchant’s Wife: A Letter.
  4. How does this piece reflect a common Modernism theme of alienation and isolation? Look at how the author uses time sequence and tone.

Day 81

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: fragile, galore, genuine

Reading

  1. Read about Robert Frost.
  2. Read Birches.
  3. Read The Road Not Taken.
  4. Read Mending Wall.
  5. Read through this study guide on Robert Frost’s poetry and try to identify his common themes in the poems you just read.

Day 82

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: hostile, illegible, impatient

Reading

  1. Read about Susan Glaspell.
  2. Read Glaspell’s one act play, Trifles.
  3. What do the men focus on as they look through the house? What do you think Glaspell is trying to say by including this? (answer: The men comment about Minnie’s poor housekeeping skills. As the play goes on, the women acknowledge that Minnie was treated unfairly by her husband. The men see her as unable to take care of her home. The women see that she was treated unfairly and may have been in the middle of tasks when she was provoked to act by the murder of her beloved canary.)
  4. What items take on symbolic importance in the play? Take notes on what the symbolism says to you.
  5. Do you think Glaspell wants the audience/reader to believe that this murder was somehow justified? What are your thoughts on it?

Day 83

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: inadvertently, inappropriate, inter

Reading

  1. Read about The Harlem Renaissance.
  2. Read about Langston Hughes.
  3. Read the essay, The Negro Artist and The Racial Mountain.
  4. What is Hughes’ main argument about one’s culture and heritage? Do you agree or disagree?
  5. What is the racial mountain he refers to?
  6. What are your thoughts on Hughes’ thesis in this essay?

Day 84

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: lucrative, mitigate, novice

Reading

  1.  Read about W.E.B. Du Bois.
  2. Read about The Souls of Black Folk.
  3. Read about Countee Cullen.
  4. Read “Any Human to Another”.
  5. What similes are found in the first and second stanzas? What ideas are they used to support?
  6. The poet uses some visual imagery in the third stanza. What is that imagery? What is the warning along with it?
  7. What is being contrasted in the last two stanzas? Why might the author have used the associated images that he does?
  8. Do you agree with the argument that the speaker makes? Why or why not? Is the message relevant today?

Day 85

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: original, permanent, prohibit

Reading

  1. Read The Depression in the United States – An Overview.
  2. Read about John Steinbeck.
  3. Read about The Grapes of Wrath. Read about the themes and symbols.
  4. Read about Of Mice and Men. Read about the themes and symbols.

Day 86

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: punctual, rarity, rebuke

Reading

  1. Read about American Literature and the Southern Renaissance.
  2. Review American Renaissance & American Romanticism: The Gothic  and read about Southern Gothic.
  3. Read about William Faulkner.
  4. Read the plot overview of Faulkner’s novel The Sound and the Fury. Read about themes and symbols.

Day 87

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: suffice, transient, vacant

Reading

  1. Read about Katherine Porter.
  2. Read The Jilting of Granny Weatherall.
  3. Read about the structure of the story. How does the author use structure and elements of time (chronological and psychological) to tell the story?
  4. The author uses stream of consciousness to highlight what is happening in Granny’s mind/memory. Review the definition of stream of consciousness.

Day 88

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: cache, calamity, commend

Reading

  1. Read about Zora Neale Hurston.
  2. Read about Their Eyes Were Watching God. Read about the themes and symbols.

Day 89

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: congregate, convene, cordiality

Reading

  1. Read Making Connections 1914-1945.
  2. Read about Richard Wright.
  3. Note: Native Son is a famous and controversial novel written by Richard Wright. It depicts violence and there is a brief mention of this violence in the summaries I’m assigning here. We will not be reading the novel, but it is important to know about this novel as you may be preparing for the CLEP or similar tests.
  4. Read about Native Son. Read about the themes and symbols.

Day 90**

  1. Print off your Quarter 2 Exam Section 1 and Section 2. Complete it.
  2. Review the Quarter 2 Exam Answer Key for Section 1 and Section 2. Record your Exam grade out of 30.

Day 91

Third Quarter

Unit: The Contemporary Period (1945-Present)

  1. (*)Print out your grading sheet for the third quarter or use the Excel version.

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: despotic, dispense, dubious

Reading

  1. Read The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Overview Since 1945.
  2. Read The realist legacy and the late 1940s
  3. Read about Postmodernism.
  4. What are the major differences you see between the Postmodern era and the eras we have most recently studied?

Writing

  1. On Day 118, you will have a Persuasive Research Essay due. The Essay will be 3-5 pages in length and will be a research paper focused on a debatable issue. Essays should use a rational discussion of your chosen position. It should serve to educate your readers, but also attempt to persuade them with a call to action. Read about Argumentative Essays.
  2. You will be using this Persuasive Research Essay Rubric where each section has a maximum score of 10 points. Read the traits portion and determine how close to fulfilling that the assignment came. Score each section out of 10 points for a total of 50 points possible.
  3. The steps of your assignment should include the following:
    1. Choose your topic and create a formal proposal for your argument.
    2. Come up with a working thesis and a preliminary bibliography.
    3. Create a formal complete sentence outline.
    4. Write a rough draft with a works cited page.
    5. Write a final draft in MLA format with works cited.
  4. Read about Establishing Strong Arguments: Using Research and Evidence.

Day 92

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: edifice, relinquish, timorous

Reading

  1. Read The affluent but alienated 1950’s.
  2. Read about Arthur Miller.
  3. Read about Death of A Salesman. Read about the themes and symbols.
  4. Watch this summary of Miller’s play, The Crucible.
  5. Although Miller’s play was written in the 1950’s, it was based on the actual Salem Witch Trials of the 1690’s. People were falsely accused of practicing witchcraft with the accusers having various motives and justifications for the accusations.
  6. Miller linked this idea of false accusations by those with motives to destroy others as well as “mass hysteria” and “mob mentality” to his contemporary example of communist “witch hunts” and McCarthyism.
  7. There was a lot of fear at this time and some call this the “Age of Anxiety” due to the threats of the Cold War.

Writing

  1. Read about Establishing Strong Arguments: Organizing Your Argument.
  2. The topic for your essay should be narrowed down to a specific argument. Your topic should be supported with outside sources, statistics, etc. You will need to be able to find enough evidence to give support to your idea and be able to defend your argument against other views. Choose something that challenges you and interests you, but be sure there is enough information available to write an effective paper on the topic. What kind of facts, evidence and logic will you be able to find in your research?

Day 93

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: distinguish, divulge, facetious

Reading

  1. Read about Ralph Ellison.
  2. Read about Ellison’s novel, Invisible Man: plot overview, the themes, and the symbols.

Writing

  1. Read about Establishing Arguments: Using Rhetorical Strategies For Persuasion.
  2. Read through these argumentative writing topic ideas and choose what you would like to use for your Persuasive Research Essay or come up with your own idea.

Day 94

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: infallible, inundate, pilfer

Reading

  1. Read about Saul Bellow.
  2. Read about The Adventures of Augie March.

Writing

  1. Read about Logic in Argumentative Writing.
  2. Your essay proposal should offer a quick overview of your topic, what you currently know about your topic, some claims you believe the opposing side would make, and what your response to those objections would be. The proposal is just to get you started. You should expect things will change a bit as you move forward with your assignment. The proposal is a great way to begin organizing what you already know about your topic and what direction your research will probably need to take.
  3. Name your proposal paper at the top center of your page (Persuasive Research Essay Proposal).
    1. Each section of your proposal paper should begin with a header in bold.
    2. Press Enter a few times and at the left margin (in bold) type:  Hypothesis/Argument.
    3. Write one sentence where you state your initial claim about your topic. This isn’t your opinion. This is something that you intend to prove with research.
    4. Your next header will be titled Explanation.
    5. The explanation should be a paragraph discussing what you plan to accomplish with your paper and how you plan to accomplish your goal.
    6. The next header is Main Points. Write points discussing examples of support for your argument. Think of at least two reasons why your hypothesis/argument is a valid one.
    7. Make your next header Objections. This can just be a brief sentence that states a problem with your argument. What would the opposing viewpoint say is wrong with your argument? You need to be sure that your claim is something that can be argued against?
    8. Your final section of the proposal should be your Answer to the Objection. This is a brief explanation of how you expect to reply to the objection (problems with your claim). This doesn’t mean you have all the answers to resolve issues, but you need to acknowledge that there is another side to your claim and respond to it.

Day 95

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: superfluous, surmount, traverse

Reading

  1. Read about Flannery O’Connor.
  2. Read about “Good Country People”.
  3. Read about “The Life You Save May Be Your Own”.

Writing

  1. Read Logic in Argumentative Writing: Using Logic.

Day 96

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: abate, belligerent, conspicuous

Reading

  1. Read about Lorraine Hansberry.
  2. Read about A Raisin in the Sun. Read about its themes and symbols.
  3. When I was in high school we read this play and also watched the 1961 movie version of it.  Our whole class groaned about the idea of watching this “old black and white film from before we were born”, but we loved it. It’s a great story and the acting is really powerful in this particular version. If you are able to, I think you should check it out.

Writing

  1. Read Logic in Argumentative Writing: Logical Fallacies.

Day 97

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: deter, diminutive, dispel

Reading

  1. Some writers from 1955-1964 were considered in the Beat Generation or the Beat Movement. Read about the Beats.
  2. Read about Jack Kerouac.
  3. Jack Kerouac wrote a famous novel called On the Road. This book deals with substance abuse, excessive drinking, and having multiple relationships. In this postmodern era, there is a lot of exploring about what makes one happy and some of those answers may just be temporary “fixes” to a greater problem underneath. Sadly, Kerouac died of liver disease that was a consequence of his years of drinking heavily.

Writing

  1. Read Logic in Argumentative Writing: Using Logic in Writing.

Day 98

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: adroit, affluent, apprehensive, bildungsroman

Reading

  1. We are going to be reading the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. You will need to have a copy of this book to read as it is not available for free online due to an open copyright. You can find a copy at your local library or purchase a copy for an eReader (like Kindle). This Mass Market Paperback version is inexpensive.
  2. Parents should be aware that this book deals with a suspected violent crime, sexual abuse, and racism. It contains some rough language. Terms are used to describe African Americans that are never okay to use. Just because something was “commonly done at the time”, it does not make it right.
  3. Download this study guide for the novel. (We will not be using all of the study guide.)
  4. Read pages 7-9 of the study guide (pages 2-4 of the PDF). On page 10, read Background information (Time and Place, First-Person Point of View).
  5. Read Chapter 1 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  6. What do you learn in this chapter about Maycomb? What do you learn about Atticus Finch and his family?
  7. Why are Scout, Jem, and Dill so interested in the Radley place? What has happened to Arthur “Boo” Radley?

Writing

  1. Read Does Logic Always Work?

Day 99

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: aptitude, audacity, avarice

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 2 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. How are the social differences of the students at school exposed?
  3. What do you think of Miss Caroline Fisher as a teacher?

Writing

  1. Have you decided on your essay topic and created your formal proposal?
  2. Share it with your parent or a responsible adult and ask for feedback on your ideas.

Day 100

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: dauntless, destitute, dexterity

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 3 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What is Calpurnia’s role in the Finch household?
  3. Think about the interaction between Walter Cunningham and Atticus. What does this interaction reveal about each of these characters? What about the different ways Jem and Scout treat Walter? What does this reveal about the differences between Jem and Scout?
  4. Atticus says that you never really understand a person “until you climb into his skin and walk around in it”. What does this mean? Is this an easy thing for Scout to learn? Has this been an easy thing for you to learn?
  5. What do you learn in this chapter about the Ewell family?

Writing

  1. If your Persuasive Research topic was in the form of a question, your thesis statement is your answer to that question.
  2. Read Establishing Arguments: Developing Strong Thesis Statements to help you develop your working thesis.

Day 101

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #7. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: fortitude, indomitable, lavish

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 4 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. How does Scout feel about school?
  3. What characteristics of the children do you learn about through the Boo Radley game?
  4. Who do you think is putting the gum and pennies in the tree? Do you think this is revealing something about their character?
  5. Who do you think is laughing when Scout bumped into the Radley house with the tire?

Writing

  1. You should be gathering sources to develop a preliminary annotated bibliography for your essay. Some sources you will keep. Some you will later find are not useful and they will be removed from your final bibliography. Read Research: Where do I begin?

Day 102

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: maladroit, trepidation, versatile

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 5 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Describe Miss Maudie Atkinson. What do you think is her purpose in the novel?
  3. What does Miss Maudie tell Scout about Boo Radley and how does it compare to what Scout already believes?
  4. Why does Atticus tell the children not to play the Boo Radley game?

Writing

  1. Read Evaluating Sources: An Overview.
  2. Keep in mind that your paper should be written in MLA format. Refer to this MLA Formatting and Study Guide as you continue working on your essay.

Day 103

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: accede, accord, altercation

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 6 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. How is Jem and Scout’s relationship changing?
  3. Why does Scout not like Jem and Dill’s plan to go to the Radley windows?
  4. What does Nathan Radley know about the intruders in his garden? What does he say he will do to them?
  5. Describe what happens with Jem’s pants.  What is Jem afraid of?  Why does he insist on recovering his pants?  What does this show about Jem as a character?

Writing

  1. Read about Annotated Bibliographies and begin putting your preliminary bibliography together.

Day 104

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: antagonize, apprise, avowal

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 7 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What was interesting about how Jem found his pants?
  3. How is Jem changing his views on Boo Radley and the gifts in the tree?
  4. What happened to the hole in the tree?

Day 105

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: clandestine, discord, discrepancy

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 8 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Why does Scout want to ask Atticus about his visit to the Radley home?
  3. How does Miss Maudie feel about the destruction of her house?  What does this tell you about her character and values?
  4. What happens with Miss Maudie’s rocking chair?
  5. Describe the significance of the blanket in this chapter.

Writing

  1. Have you been able to come up with a working thesis and preliminary bibliography for your paper?
  2. Share where you are at with your parent or a responsible adult and ask for feedback on your ideas.

Day 106

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: embroil, enigmatic, estrange

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 9 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What is Atticus’ reasoning for defending Tom Robinson?  What does he mean when he says, “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win”? What major theme of the novel does this seem to reference?
  3. How does Uncle Jack describe Scout’s changes?
  4. What does Scout learn overhearing Atticus’ conversation with Uncle Jack?
  5. Read the last sentence of this chapter. What do you think this means? Why might this be important in this story?

Writing

  1. The next step in your paper is to create a Complete Sentence Outline.
  2. Read about How to Outline.
  3. Read about Creating an Argument Outline.

Day 107

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: irreconcilable, latent, litigation

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 10 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Atticus tells his children that “it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird”. What reason does he give for saying this? How might this idea become a theme in the novel? Who are the metaphorical “mockingbirds” in the story?
  3. Describe the situation with the mad dog.  How does this change the children’s perception of Atticus?

Day 108*

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: manifest, overt, relent

Reading*

  1. Read Chapter 11 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Why does Jem cut off the tops of Mrs. Dubose’s Camilla plants?
  3. Atticus tells his children why he believes Mrs. Dubose is a brave and good person. What might be a symbolic connection here with why he is defending Tom Robinson?
  4. Look over the paragraph that begins, “She was. She had her own views about things. . .” What theme does the author show here? How?
  5. *Print off and complete pages 12-13 of the study guide (pg 7-8 of the PDF). Skip the Extending Your Response section, but complete Literature and Writing (Character Analysis).

Writing

  1. Have you finished your Complete Sentence outline?
  2. Share what you have with your parent or a responsible adult and ask for feedback on your ideas.
  3. If you have not begun it already, you should begin working on your rough draft with a works cited page.
  4. Remember that your final paper is due on Day 118. Give yourself enough time to work through your rough draft and compare it to the rubric to determine any necessary changes.

Day 109

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: bulwark, cogent, commodious

Reading

  1. Read the Background information on page 14 of the study guide.
  2. Read Chapter 12 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  3. How has Jem changed? How does this change his relationship with Scout?
  4. Scout and Jem visit Calpurnia’s church. Dicuss Lula, Reverend Sykes, and Zeebo.
  5. What do these characters say about African American society in the story?
  6. Why does Calpurnia switch her dialect?

Day 110

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: decrepit, dilapidated, enervate

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 13 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Aunt Alexandra comes to stay with the Finch family. What is she like? What does she contribute to the family? to the story?
  3. At the end of the chapter what is Atticus trying to tell his children? Why does he stop?

Day 111*

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #8. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: formidable, gamut, impregnable

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 14 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. When Scout asks Atticus if she can visit Calpurnia’s home, some tensions develop. What happens? What is Jem’s reaction?
  3. Jem and Scout are changing their perceptions of things. Explain how?
  4. Why does Alexandra think Atticus should fire Calpurnia? What is Atticus’ response?
  5. Why does Dill run away? What are the differences between Dill’s home life and the Finch kids?

Day 112

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: inadvertent, incapacitate, infinitesimal

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 15 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What is the “nightmare” facing the Finch family now?
  3. What was the “mob” trying to do and what stopped them?  How is this related to a theme in the novel?
  4. What does Mr. Underwood do and why is it unusual?
  5. How is Scout causing changes in things? What does she do for Walter Cunningham?

Writing

  1. Write a Response to Literature for the first half of To Kill A Mockingbird. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  2. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.
  3. Your rough draft for your essay should be completed.
  4. Share it with your parent or a responsible adult and ask for feedback on your ideas.
  5. Compare it to the Persuasive Research Essay Rubric to see how you are doing. Make any necessary changes.

Day 113

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: infirmity, inordinate, iota

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 16 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Who is Dolphus Raymond? What is Raymond’s story?
  3. The court case uses the literary technique of “local color”. Review the definition of regionalism/local-color fiction. Why does the author use this?
  4. What is Judge Taylor like? Describe his attitude about the case.

Writing

  1. Read about Beginning Proofreading.
  2. Read about Finding Common Errors.
  3. Read about Suggestions for Proofreading for Errors.
  4. Use these ideas to make final proofreading efforts for your rough draft.

Day 114

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: meticulous, picayune, pittance

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 17 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What are the main points of Heck Tate’s evidence? What evidence does Atticus use in his cross-examination?
  3. What do we learn about the Ewell family?
  4. Why does Atticus ask Bob Ewell to write out his name?

Writing

  1. Begin your final draft making sure you are staying in MLA format with works cited.
  2. Your final draft is due on Day 118.
  3. You could submit your essay to peer editing and see if you get feedback on your essay before your final draft is due.

Day 115

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: remiss, scrupulous, scrutinize

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 18 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What do you think of Mayella as a character?
  3. What are the flaws in Mayella’s testimony?
  4. Atticus “mocks” Mayella. How does he do this? Does it reveal anything about her character?
  5. What does Scout notice when Mayella identifies Tom Robinson? How is this significant?
  6. What was important about Mayella’s “bruised face”? What do we learn about Atticus as a lawyer with this?
  7. What does Mayella reveal about herself with her final words? Why does she say what she does?

Day 116

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: slovenly, solicitude, tenacious

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 19 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Summarize Tom Robinson’s testimony. What does his testimony expose about Bob Ewell? What social mistake does Tom make?
  3. Why does Scout think Mayella is lonely?
  4. Describe the contrast between how Mr. Gilmer treats Tom and how Atticus treats Mayella in Chapter 18.
  5. Why does Dill became sick?

Day 117

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: vehement, vigilance, wary

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 20 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What do we find out about Dolphus Raymond? What does this show the reader about Maycomb?
  3. What does Jem think will happen with the trial verdict? What does this reveal about Jem?
  4. Think about Atticus’ final statement. What are some important points?

Writing

  1. Reminder: Your Persuasive Research Essay is due tomorrow.

Day 118*

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: acquiesce, compulsory, concurrent

Reading*

  1. Read Chapter 21 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What is Jem’s reaction to the verdict? And why?
  3. What does the crowd do as Atticus leaves the courtroom? Why?
  4. *Print off and complete pages 16-17 of the study guide (pg 11-12 of the PDF). Skip the Extending Your Response section, but complete Literature and Writing (News Story).

Writing

  1. Your Persuasive Research Essay is due. Your essay should be 3-5 pages in length. Use this Persuasive Research Essay Rubric and record the grade.

Day 119

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: defer, denizen, docile

Reading

  1. Read the Background information on page 18 of the study guide (page 13 of the PDF).
  2. Read Chapter 22 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  3. Why do people bring food to the Finch home?
  4. How do the children (Scout, Jem, and Dill) react after the trial? Can you connect this to a theme?
  5. What purpose do Miss Stephanie and Aunt Rachel serve as characters?
  6. What does Miss Stephanie reveal at the end of the chapter?

Day 120

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: domicile, entail, imminent

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 23 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. How does Atticus react to Bob Ewell’s insult? How do the children react to it?
  3. What is Atticus’ opinion about why Bob Ewell acted as he did? Why is this ironic?
  4. Look at the two paragraphs beginning with “You couldn’t, but they could and did. . .” and ending with “. . .children’s time.” What new information about Atticus’ character does this passage reveal?
  5. Why does Atticus have hope that his efforts weren’t wasted?
  6. How does Jem interpret the way Maycomb operates in a caste system? Does this show something is happening to Jem? How does Scout respond? What does this reveal about Scout?
  7. Why does Jem say Boo wants to stay indoors?

Day 121*

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #9. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: imperative, incipient, incumbent

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 24 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What is Aunt Alexandra’s missionary circle like? How do they view other cultures? Are they genuine in their feelings or hypocritical?
  3. Describe Grace Merriweather and Mrs. Farrow.
  4. Why did Tom Robinson run? What happened to him?
  5. Aunt Alexandra politely returns to her missionary circle even after they insulted her brother. What lesson does Scout learn from her?

Day 122

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: indispensable, infraction, insubordinate

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 25 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What happens with the “roly-poly” bug? How does this relate to a theme of the novel?
  3. Mr. Underwood describes Tom’s death as “the senseless slaughter of songbirds” in his editorial. Why is this significant?
  4. Explain the contrast Scout draws between the court where Tom was tried and “the secret courts of men’s hearts.”

Day 123

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: insurgent, insurrection, intermittent

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 26 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. When Scout finds out that Atticus knew about the situation with Jem’s pants, how does this change her perception of her father?
  3. Mrs. Gates discusses Hitler with the class. What does she say about prejudice? Why is this ironic?
    How does this affect Scout?

Day 124

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: malcontent, meek, oblige

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 27 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Three strange things happen in Maycomb. What are they?
  3. Look at the paragraph beginning with, “I think I understand. . .” Why does Atticus think Bob Ewell acts the way he does?

Day 125

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: obviate, perennial, pliable

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 28 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. How does the beginning of this chapter remind you of earlier events in the novel?
  3. What happens as Jem and Scout walk to the pageant? What literary device is being used here?
  4. What upsets Scout about her costume? What literary device is being used here?
  5. Who is the man who helps Jem and Scout?

Day 126

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: prerequisite, protract, sedition

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 29 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. What is explanation Atticus gives for Bob Ewell’s attack?
  3. What explanation does Heck Tate give?
  4. How does Scout react when she finds out the mystery man was Boo?

Day 127

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: sojourn, sporadic

Reading

  1. Read Chapter 30 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. Who does Atticus think is responsible for Bob Ewell’s death?
  3. How do Atticus, Aunt Alexandra, and Dr. Reynolds treat Boo?
  4. What do Heck and Atticus argue about?
  5. Why can’t Atticus “put two and two together” this time?
  6. How does Scout explain her understanding of Heck not wanting to reveal Boo’s involvement? How does that play into a theme in the novel?

Day 128*

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: tractable, transgress, unabridged

Reading*

  1. Read Chapter 31 of To Kill A Mockingbird.
  2. How do the final events of the novel explain the first sentence of the novel?
  3. Boo says goodbye to Jem and Scout walks him home. She never sees him again. What is implied here?
  4. Scout reflects on an earlier comment of Atticus. How does she make sense of it now?
  5. Why does Scout retell the story through seasons?
  6. Atticus reads the “Gray Ghost” story at the end of the novel. What is significant about this?
  7. *Print off and complete pages 20-22 of the study guide (pg 15-17 of the PDF). Skip the Extending Your Response and the Literature and Writing. Complete the final response on the last page as a way to help you formulate a Response to Literature.
  8. Write a Response to Literature for To Kill A Mockingbird. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  9. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Day 129

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: abdicate, abhor, abscond

Reading

  1. Read The turbulent but creative 1960s.
  2. Read about William Stafford.
  3. Read “Traveling through the Dark”
  4. In this poem, man/technology has harmed nature. What do you think is the message being conveyed when the speaker makes his decision?
  5. Go to this analysis page for the poem and scroll down to read Terry Fairchild’s take on it. Do you agree or disagree with this interpretation?

Day 130

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: absolve, adherent, adjacent

Reading

  1. Read about Joseph Heller.
  2. Read about Catch 22.

Day 131

Vocabulary

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #10. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: adjoin, adjourn, adversary

Reading

  1. Read about Confessional Poetry.
  2. Read about Sylvia Plath.
  3. Read “Morning Song”.
  4. What is this poem describing?
  5. Does the new mother feel an instant connection to her child or is it more subtle as the poem progresses? What images or words support your idea?
  6. Read “Blackberrying”.
  7. What are some examples of personification and alliteration in the poem?
  8. Where does the author use imagery to convey a theme of childhood or death?

Day 132

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: adverse, antecedents, antedate

Reading

  1. Read about Kurt Vonnegut.
  2. Read about Slaughterhouse-Five.

Day 133

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: averse, avert, avocation

Reading

  1. Read about the Civil Rights Movement in America.
  2. Watch Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.
  3. Read “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King Jr.
  4. Why is nonviolent civil disobedience needed? Why shouldn’t they “wait”? How does King justify their impatience? Examine the anecdotal evidence King presents. Do you feel he makes effective arguments? Why or why not?
  5. How does King differentiate between a just and an unjust law? Compare King’s reasoning with Thoreau’s (“Resistance to Civil Government” from earlier in this course).
  6. Can you make any comparisons to what is currently happening with racial tensions in America?

Day 134

Reminder: Your Quarter 3 Exam is tomorrow.

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: bicentennial, biennial, bilateral

Reading

  1. Read about Richard Wilbur.
  2. Read “The Writer”.
  3. The poet describes his daughter’s struggles as a writer. A metaphor of a boat is used. What words related to boats does the author use and what is the effect?
  4. The rest of the poem, his daughter’s writing is described as a starling. Her writing is trapped in that room while it is still in the process. Think about how writer’s block or a struggle to get to the heart of a piece you’re working on might feel like a “matter of life and death” for a writer.
  5. Read “Boy at the Window”.
  6. What is the irony about the boy’s understanding about what is best for the snowman?

Day 135**

  1. *Print off your Quarter 3 Exam Section 1 and Section 2. Complete it.
  2. Review the Quarter 3 Exam Answer Key for Section 1 and Section 2. Record your Exam grade out of 30.

Day 136

Fourth Quarter

  1. (*)Print out your grading sheet for the fourth quarter or use the Excel version.

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: bipartisan, bisect, benediction

Reading

  1. Read about The 1970s and 1980s: New Directions.
  2. Read about Joyce Carol Oates.
  3. Read about Stephen King.

Day 137

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: beneficiary, benevolent, contraband

Reading

  1. Read about Maxine Hong Kingston
  2. Read about The Woman Warrior.

Day 138*

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: contravene, countermand, decadent

Reading*

  1. Read about Gwendolyn Brooks.
  2. Read “We Real Cool”.
  3. *Print off and complete the worksheet titled, “The Impact of a Poem’s Line Breaks: Quiz“. Do not count this as a quiz. Just complete the worksheet using the poem.

Day 139

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: deciduous, demote, depreciate

Reading

  1. Read about Judith Guest.
  2. Read about Ordinary People (1976).

Day 140

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: dissident, eminent, excise

Reading

  1. Read about Alex Haley.
  2. Read about Roots: the Saga of an American Family

Day 141

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: extraneous, impel

Reading

  1. Read about Maya Angelou.
  2. Read about “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings”.
  3. Read “Still I Rise“.
  4. This poem is speaking about the writer’s struggle against difficulties. The writer must be persistent.
  5. How does Maya Angelou’s view of “the dream and the hope of the slave” compare and contrast with Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” (Day 133)?

Day 142

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: implicate, impugn, impunity

Reading

  1. Read about Norman Mailer.

Day 143

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: incessant, incise, inclusive

Reading

  1. Read about Alice Walker.
  2. Read about The Color Purple. (Note: There is a lot of violence and abuse even in the description of the book.)

Day 144

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: incontrovertible, inhibit, inscribe

Reading

  1. Read about Sandra Cisneros.
  2. Read about The House on Mango Street

Day 145

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #11. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: insoluble, intercede

Reading

  1. Read about Toni Morrison
  2. Read about Beloved.

Day 146

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: intercept, interlinear, interlude

Reading

  1. Read about Amy Tan.
  2. Read about The Joy Luck Club.

Day 147

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: intermediary, interurban, intervene

Reading

  1. Read about Tim O’Brien.
  2. Read about The Things They Carried.(1990)
  3. Read about the themes.

Day 148

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: intramural, intrastate

Reading

  1. Read about John Grisham

Day 149

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: intravenous, invoke, irrevocable

Reading

  1. Read about Barbara Kingsolver.
  2. Read about The Poisonwood Bible.

Day 150

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: abase, aberration, abet

Writing

  1. For the remainder of this course, you will be focusing on a final writing project. It will be due on Day 180.
  2. Also, on Day 180 you will have your final exam. Your exam will not be cumulative. It will consist of what we have discussed in the 4th quarter. Due to how this final quarter is constructed, your final exam will be heavy on vocabulary and on what elements/techniques of writing are covered in the instruction of your final writing project.
  3. Choose a fiction novel or a play by an American author for your final writing project. This must be something we have not read in class. Talk over your choice with your parent or responsible adult. Be sure they are okay with your choice. Your choice should be something that you find interesting, so you can do well with the project.
  4. Read through the entire Final Writing Project Assignment. Be aware that your writing project will include: a reading log, an oral presentation of a summary with review, a creative assignment, and a literary analysis.
  5. The entire project will be worth 120 points.
  6. All parts of the writing project will be due on Day 180. Class instructions will focus on each section of the project in order, but the pace you work at is ultimately up to you. Work on the different parts of the writing project should overlap and relate to each other. You should work on each piece as part of a complete project.

Day 151

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: abide, abject, abjure

Writing

  1. The first requirement for your writing project is a Reading Log where you will annotate as you work through the piece. As you read your selection, you will be expected to keep notes showing your interaction with the text. This can be kept as a journal in a notebook or a document on your computer.
  2. Note important information about characterization and events. Ask questions that you hope will be answered as you continue reading. Consider what critical reading questions you could include. There should be an entry for every section/chapter of the reading.
  3. As you finish each section write a summary of memorable scenes and quotes. Include a summary of the action and any character development you noticed. Tell why you thought the scene or quote was memorable.  Always make sure you include the page number, chapter number, etc. where you found what you are noting. You should be citing using MLA format. Make note of any literary or rhetorical devices used. (We will be reviewing these from earlier in the course.)

Day 152

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: abnegation, abrogate, absolution

Writing

  1. Begin planning out your writing project. Keep in mind that your writing should be in MLA format. Refer to this MLA Formatting and Study Guide as you work through your project.
  2. Review: Read about Annotating and Close Reading.
  3. Read about Double-Entry Reading Journals and how they are used with literature.

Day 153

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: abstruse, accost, accretion

Writing

  1. Review the definition of characterization.
  2. As you read through your selected work, make note of significant information about the characters.
  3. Over the next several days, we are going to discuss some methods of characterization.
  4. The most obvious way of describing a character is through physical description.
  5. This can include height, weight, skin/eye/hair color, etc.
  6. This can also include how the character walks or stands. In a play, this can include notes given for the actors to include in their performance as they move around the stage.
  7. Another way of examining characterization is by analyzing the character’s name. The name choice is not always significant, but many times it is.
  8. An author may choose a character’s name because it represents something about the character, the story, or both.
    (When I was younger and would write many stories, I purchased a baby name book just so I could use the different meanings of names for specific characters.)
  9. A character’s attitude can be another method for describing. The attitude of a character is revealed in how he or she feels or appears to feel about what is happening to him or her in the story.

Day 154

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: acerbic, acrimony, acumen

Writing

  1. Today we will continue looking at methods of characterization.
  2. Review the definition of dialogue.
  3. Dialogue is the way a character talks. This includes both the diction and the syntax.
  4. Review the definitions of diction and syntax.
  5. Included in the dialogue is also the tone the character uses.
  6. Review the definition of tone.
  7. So much of our personality comes across in how we speak not just what we say. Do you like to be sarcastic? Are you shy? Are you usually serious? All of these qualities can be demonstrated through dialogue.

Day 155*

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #12. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: acute, adamant, adept

Writing

  1. The thoughts of a character can also reveal quite a lot about him or her. However, not every character has their thoughts revealed for you to analyze.
  2. Review the definition of point of view.
  3. Review the definition of omniscient.
  4. Sometimes the narrator will know what the characters are all thinking and in these works thought analysis is possible.
  5. In a play, we can learn the thoughts of characters through soliloquy. Review the definition.
  6. How other characters react and interact with the character you wish to analyze is another step in understanding characterization. How do other characters treat this character? How do they respond verbally and physically?
  7. You may be able to determine if your character is viewed as kind, trustworthy, dependable or just the opposite.

Day 156

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: admonish, adulation, adumbrate

Writing

  1. Events, actions, or incidents can influence characterization.
  2. How did the character react to the incident? How did it affect the character?
  3. What choices did the character make in the event?
  4. Is there some action or incident in the character’s past that has shaped him or her?
  5. The action or event can play a role in character development as the story moves forward.
  6. Setting can also be significant for character development. Review the definition of setting. Think of ways the author may be using where or when the story takes place to influence how a character develops.

Day 157

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: advocate, aerial, aesthetic

Writing

  1. Critical reading is something that will continue to be important for you as you explore options such as higher education or enter the workforce. Critical reading is part of tests such as the SAT.
  2. Critical reading might be something you would expect to find more with non-fiction, but it can be useful with fiction and drama as well.
  3. Reading a piece more than once is a big part of reading critically. That may seem a little daunting of a task when you are reading a novel, but it doesn’t have to be if you pace yourself.
  4. A first read gives you the big picture of the work.
  5. A slow read can allow you to examine the details more closely. You can pay attention to the words and the emotions of the piece. If you’re reading a play, then reading aloud is especially helpful for this. Go ahead, change your voices for different characters. It’s okay to have fun with your assignment.
  6. A helpful tool is to underline or highlight key words, phrases, or passages. Part of your reading log should be your notes on your own personal responses or questions that come to you as you’re reading.

Day 158

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: affable, affinity, affront

Writing

  1. Continue reading your book/play and working on your final writing project.
  2. Review the definition of genre.
  3. Read over this list of literary genres. What genre does your chosen book or play fall under?

Day 159

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: aggrandize, aggregate, aggrieved

Writing

  1. Review the Elements of Fiction using this interactive.

Day 160

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: agile, alacrity, allay

Writing

  1. Review the definition of theme.
  2. Read about Sample Book Themes.
  3. One common theme is The American Dream. This can be defined as: America is a land of opportunity. You can make a name for yourself no matter who you are or where you come from. Hard work is all you need. Many times authors use this theme to show that this dream is really something that cannot be obtained. It can actually be destructive.
  4. Another common theme is a Loss of Innocence. Think about everything the Finch children experienced in To Kill A Mockingbird. This novel also used the theme of Coming of Age, to show maturity and wisdom being obtained. Some characters are forced to grow up quickly because of the circumstances they face.
  5. The Land and the Frontier can also be another theme. America was founded on discovering land and building a life. Think of how My Antonia used the land as a theme.
  6. One more theme common in American Literature is that of the hero or anti-hero. A self-made man or woman personifies the American Dream. He may struggle against the confinements or the traps of the society around him. People are flawed and sometimes the hero fails. Arthur Miller’s play, Death of A Salesman, is one example of this.

Day 161

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: amalgamate, ambivalent, ameliorate

Writing

  1. Continue reading your book/play and working on your final writing project. Refer to your instructions and rubrics in the  Final Writing Project Assignment often to be sure you are staying on task with the assignment.
  2. View this power point presentation on Literary Analysis. You may want to refer to this often as you work on this essay and future essays in this course.
  3. If the viewer does not work for you, try this direct link using Microsoft PowerPoint.

Day 162

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: amenable, amiable, amorphous

Writing

  1. Read about Analysis in Literature.
  2. Read through this article on Literary Analysis. Refer to it as you complete your Literary Analysis essay portion of your writing project.

Day 163

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: analgesic, analogous, anathema

Writing

  1. Read about The Writing Process: Drafting.
  2. Read about The Writing Process: Revising.

Day 164

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: anomaly, antediluvian, antipathy

Writing

  1. Read about The Writing Process: Revising (Assessing the Elements).

Day 165

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #13. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: antiquated, antithesis, apocryphal

Writing

  1. Read about The Writing Process Revising (Enriching the Argument).

Day 166

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: approbation, arable, arbiter

Writing

  1. Read about The Writing Process: Revising (Editing and Proofreading).

Day 167

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: debacle, dearth, deferential

Writing

  1. How are you feeling about the creative assignment portion of the writing project? Are you happy with it? You have about 2 weeks to work on it. Keep going!

Day 168

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: ebullient, egregious, elucidate

Day 169

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: eschew, fallacious, fastidious

Writing

  1. Keep working on your writing project!

Day 170

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: arcane, ardor, arrogate

Writing

  1. Continue working on your final writing project if you are not done. Refer to your instructions and rubrics in the  Final Writing Project Assignment often to be sure you are staying on task with the assignment.

Test Prep

  1. You may want to take the American Literature CLEP test after this course. If you pass, and of course you will, you would get college credit. You could also label this as an honors course. Even if you aren’t going to take the test, it won’t hurt you to try one practice question each day. Just do the one question.
  2. Read the Exam details.

Day 171

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: ascribe, aspersion, assail

Test Prep

  1. Complete a Sample Question.

Day 172

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: assiduous, assuage, augment

Test Prep

  1. Complete a Sample Question.

Day 173

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: auspicious, austere, incredulous

Test Prep

  1. Complete a Sample Question.

Day 174

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: credence, assent, sentient

Test Prep

  1. Complete a Sample Question.

Day 175*

Vocabulary*

  1. *Take Vocabulary Quiz #14. Grade it by using the answer key. Record your grade out of 21 not 22. This gives you a potential for extra credit.
  2. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: cogitate, cognizance, cogent

Writing

  1. Reminder: Your Writing Project due on Day 180.

Test Prep

  1. Complete a Sample Question.
  2. Reminder: Your final exam for the course is on Day 180. Review vocabulary and writing instruction from Day 136 through now.

Day 176

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: reticent, loquacious

Test Prep

  1. Complete a Sample Question.

Day 177

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: verbose, verbiage, pugnacious

Test Prep

  1. Complete a Sample Question.

Day 178

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: intrinsic, lament, languish

Test Prep

  1. Complete a Sample Question.

Day 179

  1. Study for your final tomorrow.
  2. Prepare to turn your final writing project (all parts) in tomorrow.

Day 180**

  1. WRITING PROJECT DUE: Use the rubrics in your Final Writing Project Assignment for grading purposes. Each section should be graded out of 30 points. The entire project is out of 120 points.
  2. Final Exam**

    1. Print Section 1 and Section 2 of your final exam.
    2. Take your test.
    3. Check your answers using Section 1’s Answer Key and Section 2’s Answer Key.
    4. Record your score out of 30.
  3. Congratulations on completing this course! I hope you enjoyed it as much as I enjoyed putting it together for you.