Drawing Professionally

Please only submit artwork to Flickr that is for this course. 

Please review the FAQs and contact us if you find a problem.

Credits: 1-2  (This course is set up to be done at your own pace, not in a certain number of days. It is recommended you spend at least an hour a day drawing. Some assignments can be done in minutes, some will take weeks.)

Prerequisite: Students should have some drawing experience before beginning this course.  Students don’t need to have had any art lessons before, though.

Recommended: Ages 10 – adult, for people who are passionate about art

Course Description: Students will learn to draw with a variety of mediums, including: graphite pencil, charcoal, pastel, colored pencil, conte crayon, and pen.  Students will also learn basic calligraphy and illumination.  Students will learn about drawing still lifes, landscapes, portraits, and clothed figures.  Students will learn a little bit about perspective and anatomy.  Students will learn many different techniques and will be encouraged to develop their own techniques and methods.  Students will begin selling their artwork online.  Students will be encouraged to be creative and mix different media to create the effects they desire.  Students will compare and contrast different styles of drawing.  Students will post their completed artwork to EP’s Drawing Professionally flickr group and offer constructive comments to the other artists.

*All images will face moderation before being allowed on the course’s flickr page. On that note, no nude images are used in the example artwork in this course, but on the art websites nude drawings/paintings can be found. You’ll need to set your own boundaries for your family about this.

Notes: Students will work at their own pace, so the course is divided into lessons instead of days.  There are 170 lessons in this course.  This course might take years to complete.  This course is for students who draw well, are passionate about art, and who would like to become professional fine artists. Students should spend at least one hour each day drawing.  Students should always use professional quality art supplies when creating a drawing that can be sold.  It’s okay to use low quality or student quality art supplies when creating a sketch or drawing for practice.

If there is an assignment that you really don’t want to complete, or that you think you won’t learn anything from, skip it.  If you are having a lot of trouble with one assignment, maybe you should stop working on it and work on other projects until you think you can finish it.  Don’t just complete the assignments in the course, draw other, pictures too.

This course will teach the drawing part of drawing professionally. There are links in the course to websites where artwork can be sold, but this course will not teach you the marketing aspect of selling your artwork. This course was created in its entirety by my daughter. Here is a link to her work online: Fine Art America. This course is unlike other EP courses in that it does require the purchase of materials that can cost a lot of money. You don’t need it all to begin the course. Start with pencils, pencil sharpener, razor blade, erasers, and student-quality paper.

Materials List

  1. graphite pencils – HB, 2B, 4B, 6B, 8B
  2. a vinyl eraser
  3. a kneaded eraser
  4. ordinary printer paper
  5. good quality watercolor paper
  6. good quality drawing paper
  7. a pencil sharpener
  8. a razor blade or X-Acto knife
  9. a ruler
  10. paper towels or tissues or napkins
  11. a chamois
  12. a sketchbook
  13. good quality colored pencils
  14. good quality chalk pastels
  15. pastel pencils
  16. vine charcoal
  17. charcoal pencils
  18. compressed charcoal
  19. conte crayons
  20. calligraphy paper
  21. a calligraphy pen or a calligraphy marker
  22. a drawing board
  23. an ordinary pen  

Lesson 1

  1. Practice drawing circles, squares, and triangles until you can draw these shapes quickly and easily.  You can draw shapes on top of each other.  Use a HB or a 2B pencil.
  2. Here’s an example.

Lesson 2

  1. Read about ways to hold a pencil.  For practice, quickly draw a circle and a straight line using each one of these six ways to hold a pencil.  You can draw the circles and lines on top of each other.
  2. Read how to sharpen a pencil with a knife.  Watch the video if you want to.
  3. Practice sharpening a pencil using a razor blade or X-Acto knife.
  4. With a HB or 2B pencil, practice drawing spheres, cones, cylinders, and cubes.  Use a large, blank piece of paper.  Always keep your pencil sharp.
  5. To create the illusion of depth, shading needs to be added.  Draw a copy of the shading chart in the corner of my example page.
  6. Shade the shapes you drew.

IMG_2458

Lesson 3

  1. For five minutes, draw circles, squares, and triangles with a HB or 2B pencil.
  2. For five minutes, move your pencil around in circles on a piece of paper without taking the pencil off the paper.
  3. This is what the paper should look like when you are done.
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  4. Read the definition of perspective.
  5. Read about one-point perspective and follow the directions.  Use a sharp HB or 2B pencil. Draw on a blank piece of paper.  Don’t press down too hard with your pencil. If your lines are too dark, they will be hard to erase.
  6. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  7. Whenever you post a drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group, make sure you give the drawing a title and a complete description.  Tell what lesson you are on and what materials you used to create the drawing.  Tell whether you copied your drawing from another drawing, copied it from a photograph, or drew it from life.  Tell whether you traced anything in your drawing or drew it all freehand, and give an estimate of how long it took you to complete the drawing.
  8. You can ask questions on EP’s drawing flickr group and answer other people’s questions.
  9. Only post drawings that have been assigned in the course and that I ask you share.
  10. Read some more about one-point perspective.  Copy the examples if you want to.
  11. Watch this video.
  12. Here are some pictures showing one-point perspective.  Choose one of them and copy it.  one  two  three  four

Lesson 4

  1. Draw circles, squares, and triangles with a HB or 2B pencil for five minutes.  Draw them as quickly as you can.  You can draw them on top of each other.
  2. Read about two-point perspective and follow the directions.
  3. Read some more about two-point perspective.
  4. Here are some pictures showing two-point perspective.  Choose one of them and copy it.  one  two  three  four  five
  5. Watch this video.

Lesson 5

  1. Read about line.
  2. Copy at least ten of these pencil drawings.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  4. Pay attention to how thick or thin and how dark or light the lines are and try to copy them as accurately as you can.
  5. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 6

  1. Pencils are graded in a decreasing scale from 9H (the hardest one) to H, and in an increasing scale from B to 9B (the softest one).  HB is the medium grade.  It is not too hard or too soft.  Pencils with hard leads draw light, clean, even lines, and soft leads are darker and crumble more.
  2. You can make dark tones in a drawing either by pressing the paper harder with your pencil or by drawing close lines on top of each other (cross-hatching).
  3. You can blend pencil strokes together by smudging them with your finger, a tortillon, a paper towel, or a chamois.  Make sure your finger is dry and clean before you use it for blending.
  4. Read about shading techniques.
  5. Read about shading and make the shading guide.
  6. Read about blending.  Blend your shading guide.
  7. Get out a piece of paper and experiment with different pencils and different shading techniques.  Try using different things to blend your pencil strokes.
  8. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 7

  1. Practice drawing circles for five minutes.
  2. Look at these drawings of spheres.
  3. The lightest part on the sphere is called the highlight.  The highlight is actually a reflection of the light that is shining on the sphere.
  4. The part of the sphere that is in between the darkest part and the lightest part is called the middletone.
  5. The darkest part on the sphere is called the core shadow.
  6. The shadow that the sphere makes on the table is called the cast shadow.
  7. Light reflects off the table and on to the bottom of the sphere.  This light is called reflected light.
  8. Some of the reflected light on the sphere reflects back off the sphere into the shadow.  This is called double-reflected light.
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  9. Draw a sphere.  Don’t copy this drawing.  Look for a sphere in your house that you can draw.  Fold a piece of tape into a square, stick it onto the sphere, and stick the sphere onto a tabletop a little bit below your eye level.  Shine light on it.  The light should be coming from only one direction.  If you can’t find a sphere, draw from this photograph instead.
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  10. Don’t trace the circle.  Draw it yourself.  Make sure your pencil is sharp, and don’t press down too hard with it.  Draw the cast shadow too.
  11. Shade the circle to turn it into a sphere.  Use curved lines to shade it because the sphere is round.  Use straight lines to shade the cast shadow because it is flat.
  12. When you are finished shading the sphere and the cast shadow, blend the pencil strokes together if you want to.
  13. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  14. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 8

  1. Read this and follow the directions to draw a mug.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  3. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 9

  1. Find a cylinder, a cube, a sphere, and a cone.  You can twist a piece of paper into a cone and tape it in place.  Tape the bottom of the sphere to the table so it doesn’t roll away.  Set these shapes up on a table a little below your eye level.  Make sure there is enough light in the room.
  2. With a HB pencil, draw your setup.  Draw the outlines of the shadows too.  Use a large piece of paper.  Don’t make the drawing too small.
  3. Check for correct perspective.
  4. Shade your drawing.  Use straight lines when shading flat things, like the cube and the table.  Use curved lines when shading round things, like the sphere and the cone.
  5. When you’re finished, post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  6. Here’s an example.

shapes setup      shapes sketch   Shapes drawing      Shapes drawing with shadows                   Shapes shaded

Lesson 10

  1. Set up a cup, an apple, and a book on a table a little below eye level.  If you don’t have an apple, use a different fruit or vegetable.
  2. With a HB pencil, quickly sketch the shape of each object.
  3. Refine the outlines of the drawing and erase the guidelines.
  4. Shade your drawing.  Draw what you actually see, not how you think it should look.
  5. Sign your name on your drawing when you’re finished and post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  6. Here’s an example.

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Lesson 11 

  1. Find two small boxes and set them on top of each other on a table just below eye level.  If you can’t find boxes, use thick books or building blocks or bricks instead.
  2. Draw them with a HB or 2B pencil.  Check for correct perspective.  Shade them with straight lines.  Don’t blend your pencil strokes together.  When you’re finished, sign your name on your drawing and post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  3. Here’s an example.

boxes

Lesson 12

  1. Read the definition of foreshorten.
  2. Here are some examples of foreshortening.  Draw copies of some of them if you want to.

Lesson 13

  1. An ellipse is a circle that is viewed at an angle.  When you look across the face of a circle, it is foreshortened, and you see an ellipse.
  2. Here are some examples of ellipses that you can copy if you want to.
  3. Read about drawing ellipses.

Lesson 14

  1. Quickly sketch some objects in your house.
  2. Use a sharp HB pencil.
  3. Here are some examples.

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Lesson 15

  1. Find some objects that have a variety of different shapes and arrange them on a table a little below eye level.
  2. Draw them quickly without looking at your paper.
  3. Get out a different piece of paper.  You can look at your paper while you draw this time.  Quickly sketch the outlines of the objects, and then check to make sure the proportions are correct.
  4. Refine the drawing and erase the guidelines.
  5. Shade your drawing.
  6. Sign your name on your drawing when you’re finished.
  7. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  8. Look at these drawings.

Lesson 16

  1. Try drawing the outline of your hand without looking at the paper.
  2. Sketch some objects in your house without looking at the paper while you draw.
  3. Study an object for a few minutes. Hold the image in your memory and try to sketch it with your eyes closed.
  4. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 17

  1. Draw this pine cone.
  2. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 18

  1. Draw your hand with a pen.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  3. Look at this pen drawing of an eye.

Lesson 19

  1. Draw this cat.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 20

  1. Choose one of the flower photos below and draw it.  Use pencils with hard leads like H and HB for shading light areas and soft 2B and 3B leads for darker areas.  You can build darkness by shading in layers.  The more layers you apply, the darker the area becomes.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
  2. Sign your drawing when you’re finished.
  3. If you have any flowers, draw them.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 21

  1. Read this and draw a shiny Christmas ornament.  If you don’t have one, draw from this photograph.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 22

  1. Read this and follow the directions.
  2. Choose one of these drawings and draw a copy of it.
  3. Copy as many of these drawings as you want to.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten

Lesson 23

  1. Here are some drawings of landscapes you can draw copies of if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
  2. Choose one of these landscape paintings and draw a picture of it.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  4. You should carry a sketchbook with you and draw landscapes when you go outside.
  5. Read this.
  6. Read about keeping a sketchbook.

Lesson 24

  1. Here’s a website you can use to sell prints of your drawings and paintings.  You can also enter contests on this website.  WARNING: Some of the artwork on this website shows nude figures.  Ask your parents for permission before you join the site or look at artwork on this website.
  2. Here’s an example of a profile page on the site.
  3. You can’t sell artwork or prints of artwork that you copied from someone else.  That is plagiarism.
  4. Here’s another website you can use to sell artwork.  WARNING: Some of the artwork on this website shows nude figures.  Ask your parents for permission before you join the site or look at artwork on this website.
  5. Here are some art contests that you can enter.
  6. Here are some more art contests.
  7. Look out a window and draw what you see.  Use a HB pencil.
  8. Don’t forget to sign your drawing when you’re finished.
  9. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  10. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or both.
  11. Look at these drawings.
  12. Read about keeping a sketchbook.

Lesson 25

  1. Throw a sheet or tablecloth over a chair and draw it.  Keep checking to make sure your drawing is accurate.  Shade your drawing.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  3. Warning: If you draw for several hours without stopping, your hand and arm will hurt, your fingers will get pink dents in them from the pencil, it will hurt to bend your fingers, and your eyes will be sore.  You should take a short break after every half hour of drawing and walk around and stretch your arms.

Lesson 26

  1. If you have any sculptures in your house, draw them.
  2. Choose one of these photos of sculptures and draw a picture of it.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three

Lesson 27

  1. Draw pictures of these paintings.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five

Lesson 28

  1. Find a leaf and draw it in your sketchbook.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  3. Here’s another website you can use to sell art online. WARNING: Some of the artwork on this website might show nude figures.  Ask your parents for permission before you join the site or look at artwork on this website.
  4. Look at this abstract pencil drawing.

Lesson 29

  1. When you’re drawing landscapes, remember that the objects in the foreground (the closest objects to the viewer) are very easy to see and the colors and tones are more intense.  Objects in the background appear lighter and cannot be seen as clearly.  This is called aerial perspective or atmospheric perspective.
  2. Look at this.

Lesson 30

  1. Chiaroscuro means the contrast between light and dark.
  2. Read about chiaroscuro.
  3. Read about Leonardo da Vinci’s use of chiaroscuro.
  4. In your sketchbook, draw sketches of these paintings showing the light and dark tones in them.
  5. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten

Lesson 31

  1. Read about how to set up a still life for drawing.
  2. Draw a still life.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  4. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  5. Look at this still life drawing.
  6. Look at these still life drawings.  Copy some of them if you want to.
  7. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten

Lesson 32

  1. Copy this photo as accurately as you can.  Don’t trace anything.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 33

  1. Crumple up a piece of white paper and put it on a table in front of you.
  2. Draw a picture of it.  It will be easier if you shine a bright light on the crumpled paper from one side.  Shade your drawing carefully.  Make sure your drawing is accurate and the tones in your drawing match the tones you actually see on the paper.
  3. Don’t draw dark outlines if you don’t actually see them around the object you are drawing.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  5. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 34

  1. Put an object in a piece of aluminum foil or a metal pot or pan.
  2. Draw a picture of them.  Shade it carefully.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  4. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  5. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 35

  1. Pour a glass of water and set it on a table where light is shining on it.
  2. Draw a picture of it.  Shade it carefully.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  4. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  5. Look at this drawing.
  6. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 36

  1. Find an object that is just one color, and set it on a table where light is shining on it.
  2. In your sketchbook, draw the outline of it, and then look for the darkest areas on the object.
  3. Draw outlines of the darkest areas, and then look for the lightest areas on the object. Draw outlines of the lightest areas.

Lesson 37

  1. Using a pencil with a soft lead, draw sketches of the paintings below showing the dark and light areas.  Don’t draw outlines of the objects in the paintings, just show the dark and light areas.  Draw these sketches in your sketchbook.
  2. Here’s an example.  This is the painting I sketched.  SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven

Lesson 38

  1. Read this.  Draw the lighter if you want to.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  3. Look at this drawing of a hand.  Notice that there are no visible lines anywhere.  The hand is not outlined.

Lesson 39

  1. Draw a picture of your hand in your sketchbook.  You don’t need to shade your drawing.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 40

  1. Here are some pictures of pencil drawings that you can look at.  Draw copies of some of them if you want to.  Maybe some of these drawings will give you ideas for new drawings you can create yourself.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten 
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty

Lesson 41

  1. Read about drawing with powdered graphite and follow the directions.

Lesson 42

  1. Read this and draw the car.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 43

  1. Read about drawing realistic trees.  Draw a landscape.  Use a large piece of paper. Use both hard and soft pencils.  Use a photograph or photographs that you took yourself.
  2.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  3. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 44

  1. Draw a picture in your sketchbook using a pen.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  3. Here’s an example.
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Lesson 45

  1. Draw pictures of these feet.
  2. If you can get somebody to pose for you, draw his or her feet.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 46

  1. Read this.
  2. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 47

  1. Now you are going to start learning to draw portraits.  Draw these skulls.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 48

  1. Draw these skeletons.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.

Lesson 49

  1. When you are drawing a head, you need to make sure that the proportions are correct.
  2. Read this and study the illustrations carefully.
  3. Read this and follow the directions.  Don’t shade the face.  The face that you draw should be better than the example drawing.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. You can make constructive comments on other’s artwork. Tell what you think is good about the drawing and tell any suggestion for improving it.
  5. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  6. Copy this.
  7. Copy these sketches of heads.

Lesson 50

  1. Re-read everything you read about proportions in Lesson 49.  Then, try to draw a face with correct proportions from imagination.
  2. When you are finished drawing, check to make sure the facial proportions you drew were correct.  Correct any mistakes that you find in your drawing.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished. I’m going to stop giving you flickr directions. Bookmark the link or find it at the top of the course page. Please comment on other people’s drawings to help them. Always say something positive and always try to help by giving a suggestion. Here’s the link for the last time, flickr group.

Lesson 51

  1. Draw a copy of this diagram.  You can use colored pencils if you want to.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.

Lesson 52

  1. Draw a copy of this diagram.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 53

  1. Draw a copy of this diagram.  You can use colored pencils if you want to.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 54

  1. Read this carefully.
  2. Read this and follow the directions.  You don’t need to use exactly the same tools.
  3. When I draw eyes, I usually use HB and 2B pencils for the iris and an 8B pencil for the pupil.
  4. Draw a copy of this diagram of an eye if you want to.
  5. Look at these drawings of eyes.  Copy some of these drawings if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
  6. Draw the eyes in these photos and post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.  one  two  three  four  five

Lesson 55

  1. Read this and follow the directions.
  2. Read this carefully.  Keep clicking Next until you get to page four.
  3. Look at these drawings of noses.  Copy some of these drawings if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
  4. Draw the noses in these photos and post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.  one  two  three  four
  5. Look in a mirror and draw your nose.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 56

  1. Read this carefully and follow the directions.
  2. Read this and draw the mouth.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  3. Look at these drawings of mouths.  Copy some of them if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
  4. Draw the mouths in these photos and post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.  one  two  three  four

 Lesson 57

  1.  Read this and draw the ear.
  2.  Read this carefully.
  3.  Look at these drawings of ears and copy some of them if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two 
    3. three
    4. four
  4. Draw the ears in these photos and post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.  one  two  three  four  five
  5. If you can, get someone to pose for you and draw their ears.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 58

  1. Read this carefully.
  2. Read this carefully.
  3. Read this carefully.
  4. Copy this drawing of hair.
  5. Copy this drawing of hair.
  6. Look at the hair in these pencil drawings.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve

Lesson 59

  1. You are going to start drawing portraits now.  Later, you will learn to draw the whole head yourself.  But right now, you are just going to trace the outlines of the head and practice shading it.
  2. First, you need to choose a photo to draw.  Choose one of the five photos here, or take a photo of someone you know.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
  3. If you are taking a photo of someone yourself, decide whether you are going to draw a full-face, profile, or three-quarter portrait, and decide if you are going to draw a background behind the head or not.  Decide whether a light or dark background would look best.  If the person you’re drawing has light hair you might need a dark background behind it.
  4. When you are taking the photo, make sure there aren’t any dark or strange-looking shadows across the person’s face.  Make sure there is enough light on the face.  Natural light is best.
  5. If you are going to draw a child, maybe you should take the photo when they’re not looking so that they don’t make strange faces at the camera.  Children and young women usually look better with weak and diffused lighting.  Make sure bright light isn’t shining in the person’s eyes.
  6. Sometimes side lighting looks interesting for men and older people.  Light should come from just one source.
  7. Print out your photo.  You can print it in black and white on regular paper.  The head should be life-size or a little smaller.
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  8. This photo was not a very good one to use because she is squinting and there are dark shadows on one side of her face.  Don’t use photos like this one unless you have to.

Lesson 60

  1. Using a pencil with a soft lead, scribble on the back of your printed photo (on regular paper) until the whole back is covered.  Now your photo is like a piece of carbon paper.
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  2. Place your photo right side up on top of the piece of paper you are going to draw the portrait on.  If you want to you can cut out a piece of paper in the shape and size you want.
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  3. If you are doing a full-face portrait, you should not place the head in the exact center of the paper.  Place it a little higher, leaving about the same amount of space at the sides.  But make sure the top of the head doesn’t get too close to the edge of the paper.
  4. If you are doing a three-quarter portrait, you should leave more room between the front of the face and the edge of the paper than at the back.
  5. If you are doing a profile portrait, you should leave lots of space in front of the face.
  6. When you have positioned the head on the paper, hold your photo down and trace the outlines of the face carefully with a sharp pencil.  Be careful not to let the photo move until you are finished tracing.  Trace the outlines of the shadows too.
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  7. When you are finished tracing, erase any smudges the back of the photo might have made on your paper.  If you made a mistake while you were tracing, erase it and draw the line yourself.  If a line is too light for you to see, draw another line over it to darken it.  Be especially careful to correct any mistakes you made while tracing the eyes.

Lesson 61

  1. Now you are going to start shading the portrait.  Don’t use the same photo you used for tracing.  Look at the photo on a computer or print it out again in color.
  2. Start shading the eyes first.  Look at Lesson 54 again if you need a reminder.  Place a sheet of paper between your hand and the paper you are drawing on so that your hand does not smudge the drawing.  Always keep your pencil points sharp.
  3. When you are finished shading the eyes, post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. After you have received feedback on the eyes you drew and have corrected any mistakes, move on to Lesson 62.
  5. Look at this drawing of a little girl.

Lesson 62

  1. Next, shade the forehead, cheeks, nose, and mouth.  Look at lessons 55 and 56 again if you need to.
  2. Shade the eyebrows, the ears and the hair.  Look at lessons 57 and 58 again if you need to.
  3. When you are finished, post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have corrected any mistakes, move on to Lesson 63.

Lesson 63

  1. Shade the neck and the top of the shirt, if you are going to include some of the shirt in the portrait.  You should probably make the shirt get lighter and lighter as it gets closer to the edge of the paper until it fades into the paper.
  2. If you are including a background, shade it now.
  3. Sign your name on your drawing when you’re finished.
  4. Post your finished drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  5. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.

Lesson 64

  1. Draw another portrait like you just learned how to do.  Use a different photo this time.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  3. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  4. Once you have finished all the lessons where you trace from photographs, you should not trace anymore.  You can trace at first to help you learn to shade portraits in pencil, but once you can shade a traced portrait well, don’t trace any more unless you are making a portrait for somebody else and you are under a time limit.  Tracing is easier, but you should teach yourself to draw freehand.
  5. After you are able to draw a portrait freehand from a photograph, without tracing or using a grid, I recommend forcing yourself to stop using photographic reference and teaching yourself to draw from life.  When you’re drawing a portrait from life, it’s better to use charcoal than pencil because charcoal is much faster to draw with and very easy to erase.  Take every opportunity to practice drawing portraits from life.  Whenever somebody in your family is watching TV, working at a computer, or taking a nap, you can quickly draw a portrait of them.  The portraits don’t have to be more than sketches.

Lesson 65

  1. Read this and draw the horse.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 66

  1. Read this.
  2. Draw another portrait.  Use a photo that you haven’t used before.
  3. When you’re finished, post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  5. If you are planning to go to art school, you will need to submit a portfolio of your best artwork when you apply.  It probably wouldn’t be a good idea to include the portrait you just did in your portfolio, for several reasons:
    1. You should try to include as many observational drawings as possible in your portfolio.  An observational drawing is a realistic drawing that you did while looking at the actual subject matter, not from photographic reference. Including observational drawings in your portfolio will put you far ahead of students who only include drawings from photographs.  You will have a big advantage if you can demonstrate that you have the ability to observe something in real life and draw it accurately.  The people who will be looking at your portfolio will be able to tell which drawings were copied from photographs and which were drawn from life.
    2. You should not include any drawings in your portfolio that you traced from photographs and then shaded.  Show that you have the ability to draw freehand.
    3. The drawings that you include in your portfolio should show that you’re thinking about the whole space.  You shouldn’t include drawings of items that are floating in the middle of the paper on a white background.  That shows that you are only thinking about the main subject of the drawing, and not the background.

Lesson 67

  1. Draw another portrait using a photo that you haven’t used before.
  2. When you’re finished, post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  3. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.

Lesson 68

  1. Draw another portrait.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  2. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  3. Look at these portraits.  Maybe you can learn something from looking at them, or maybe some of them will give you ideas for your own drawings.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve

Lesson 69

  1. Draw another portrait.  This time, don’t blend your pencil strokes together.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  3. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  4. Look at this portrait.

Lesson 70

  1. Read this.
  2. Draw another portrait and post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  3. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  4. Draw these heads.

Lesson 71

  1. Read about negative drawing.
  2. Choose one of these photos of animals, or take a photo yourself if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
  3. Draw a picture of the animal you chose.  Don’t trace the outlines; draw everything yourself.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  5. If you drew the animal portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.

Lesson 72

  1. Read this.
  2. Draw a portrait of yourself.  This is called a self-portrait.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 73

  1. Read this.
  2. Draw another portrait using a photo you haven’t used before.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  4. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.

Lesson 74

  1. Draw your hand.  Shade your drawing.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  2. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 75

  1. Learn how to draw a portrait using a grid.
  2. Read this.
  3. Read this.
  4. Draw a portrait using a grid instead of tracing.
  5. If you don’t want to take your own photo, here are some photos you can choose from.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
  6. When you’re finished, post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  7. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.

Lesson 76

  1. Draw another portrait using a grid.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  3. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  4. Look at this portrait.
  5. Read this.

Lesson 77

  1. Read this article about how to make a portfolio for art school or college.
  2. Read this.  Find two forks, two knives, and two spoons.  Tie them together and place them on a table below your eye level.  Shine light on them.
  3. Draw them as accurately as you can.  Shade your drawing.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  5. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 78

  1. Read about drawing portraits.
  2. Look at these pictures.
  3. Read this.
  4. Find a clear glass cup or jar or vase.  If you can’t find any glass, use clear plastic instead.  Fill it halfway with water and set it on a table below your eye level.  Put one metal fork, one metal spoon, one metal knife and one other small metal object into the water.  Shine light on your setup.
  5. Draw your setup as accurately as you can.  Shade it carefully.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  6. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 79

  1. Now you’re going to learn how to draw the whole portrait yourself, without tracing anything or using a grid.
  2. Carefully study this diagram showing the proportions of the head.
  3. Study this diagram showing how to draw the head in three-quarter view.
  4. Study this diagram carefully.
  5. Study this picture carefully.
  6. Study these pictures carefully.
  7. Look at these drawings showing proportions of babies heads.
  8. Read this.
  9. Look at these drawings.

Lesson 80

  1. Look at these pictures.
  2. Choose a photo of a face to draw.  You can take a photo yourself or use one from lesson 59 or 75.  Print the photo out in color.
  3. Quickly sketch a shape to show where the outline of the head will be.  Then, draw a line across the head to show where the eyes will be.  Draw another smaller line below it to show where the bottom of the nose will be.  Then, draw another line below that to show where the mouth will be.  Make sure you aren’t pressing down hard with the pencil.
  4. Draw the head now.  You should draw the eyes last because they are the hardest part to get right.  When you have finished drawing the head, carefully erase the guidelines.
  5. Check your drawing for mistakes.  Erase the mistakes and keep trying to draw those areas until you draw them correctly.
  6. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it, shade your drawing.
  7. Post your finished drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  8. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.

Lesson 81

  1. Draw five more portraits without tracing or using a grid.  You don’t need to shade them if you don’t want to.
  2. Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  3. If you drew the portraits from photographs that you took yourself, upload them to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your portraits and have improved them.
  4. Look at these drawings of hair.

Lesson 82

  1. Now you’re going to learn to draw with colored pencils.
  2. Read about colored pencil drawing techniques.
  3. Experiment with using colored pencils.  Try to blend the pencil strokes together using different materials, try erasing the pencil strokes, try layering different colors on top of each other to create new colors, and try using different papers.

Lesson 83

  1. Red, yellow, and blue are called primary colors.  You can’t make these colors by mixing other colors.  Every other color is made by mixing these colors.
  2. Green, purple and orange are called secondary colors.  A secondary color is made by mixing two primary colors.
  3. Blue-green, blue-purple, red-purple, red-orange, yellow-orange and yellow-green are called tertiary colors.  A tertiary color is made by mixing a primary color with a secondary color.
  4. Yellow-green, yellow, yellow-orange, orange, red-orange, red, and red-purple are called warm colors.  Warm colors are colors associated with things that are warm.
  5. Green, blue-green, blue, blue-purple, and purple are called cool colors.  Cool colors are colors associated with things that are cold.
  6. You need to memorize this information before you move on to Lesson 84.

Lesson 84

  1. Hue is the color itself, value is the lightness or darkness of a color, and intensity is the strength of a color.
  2. Complimentary colors are two colors that are opposites of each other.  Red is the compliment of green, yellow is the compliment of purple, and orange is the compliment of blue.
  3. The compliment of a warm color is always a cool color.  Using two complimentary colors next to each other in a drawing or painting will create the greatest contrast possible.  To draw attention to a certain color, use some of its compliment next to it.  Two complimentary colors mixed with each other make brown.
  4. Click on each color on this color wheel and all the words at the bottom.
  5. You need to memorize all this information before you move on to Lesson 85.

Lesson 85

  1. Read about color as symbol.
  2. Read about color as light.
  3. Read about color as emotion.

Lesson 86

  1. Read about color terms.
  2. Read some more about color terms.
  3. Take this quiz.  If you got more than three questions wrong, take the quiz a second time.

Lesson 87

  1. Read about drawing with colored pencils.
  2. Read about colored pencil drawing techniques.
  3. Read this and draw the apple.  You don’t have to use exactly the same pencils.
  4. Read about colored pencil drawing techniques.  Keep clicking next until you get to the last page.
  5. Read about different kinds of paper.

Lesson 88

  1. Read this and draw the flower.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 89

  1. Read this and draw the beetle.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 90

  1. Read this and draw the butterfly.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 91

  1. Draw copies of at least three of these colored pencil drawings.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
  2. Choose one of these abstract colored pencil drawings and draw a copy of it.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
  3. Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 92

  1. Read about removing wax bloom.
  2. Read about materials for colored pencil drawing.
  3. Read about improving color intensity.
  4. Read about blending colored pencil.
  5. Draw this dog.
  6. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 93

  1. Read about different brands of colored pencils.
  2. Look at these colored pencil portraits.
  3. Draw a portrait using colored pencils.  Draw everything yourself.  Don’t trace the outlines or use a grid.
  4. Remember to always keep your pencil points sharp.
  5. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  6. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  7. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 94

  1. Look at these colored pencil drawings.  Draw copies of some of them if you want to, and post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen

Lesson 95

  1. Draw another portrait using colored pencils.  Don’t trace the outlines of the face.  Draw them yourself.
  2. If you have watercolor paper, watercolor paints and brushes that work well with watercolor, try painting with watercolor first and then drawing with colored pencils on top of the painting after the paint is completely dry.
  3. Post your portrait to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. If you drew the portrait from a photograph that you took yourself, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  5. Look at this colored pencil landscape drawing.
  6. Watch this video.
  7. If you haven’t taken the art appreciation course yet, you should start taking it now. You should make a habit of looking at artwork and writing or talking about it.

Lesson 96

  1. Read this.
  2. Read this.
  3. Set up a still life and draw it using colored pencils.  Take a photo of your setup before you start drawing so that if something gets moved before you are finished you can put it back in the right place, but don’t draw from the photograph.  Draw from life.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  5. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  6. Read this.  Click on each drawing to see it up close.

Lesson 97

  1. Read this.  If you want to, draw this picture and post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  2. Grisaille means a painting or drawing done in shades of only one color, usually grey.
  3. Look at this portrait.

Lesson 98

  1. Now you’re going to learn how to draw using pastels.
  2. Experiment with using pastels before you begin drawing with them.  Try drawing on different kinds of paper, try using different materials to blend the pastel, try to erase pastel, try layering different colors on top of each other and try mixing colors together in different ways.
  3. Read this and draw the still life if you want to.  You don’t need to use exactly the same materials.
  4. Read about how to use pastels.
  5. Read this and draw the eye.

Lesson 99

  1. Read this.
  2. Read this and draw the lighthouse.  You don’t have to use exactly the same pastels or paper.  If you don’t have gray paper, you can use white paper or paint a piece of white paper gray with watercolor paint.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. If you have any questions about using pastels look at this.
  5. For preliminary drawing, use hard pastels, colored pencils or graphite pencils.  Use hard pastels for drawing small details.
  6. You can spray your pastel drawings with fixative when you’re finished drawing, but it might change the colors.  If you don’t have fixative, you can use hairspray instead.  Hairspray will change the colors more than fixative will.

Lesson 100

  1. Read about the visual elements of art.
  2. Draw copies of some of these pastel drawings.  Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
  3. You can crush leftover fragments of pastel and pick up the powder with a cloth or cotton ball and use it for drawing smooth areas.

Lesson 101

  1. Read this and draw the tiger.  You don’t have to use the same color of paper.  You can use a different kind of pastel if you don’t have oil pastels.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  3. Read this.

Lesson 102

  1. Read this and draw the fish.  You can use a different kind of pastel if you don’t have chalk pastels.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 103

  1. Read this and draw a still life.  Draw it from life, but take a photo of your setup before you begin so that you can put things back in the right place if they get moved.  You can use a different kind of pastel if you don’t have oil pastels.
  2. Post your still life to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  3. Oil pastels can be diluted with turpentine and used like paint.

Lesson 104

  1. Using pastels, draw pictures of these paintings.  Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six

Lesson 105

  1. Draw a portrait using pastels.  Don’t trace anything or use a grid.  Draw everything yourself.  Use a photo that you took yourself.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  3. Look at this portrait.
  4. Look at this portrait.
  5. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 106

  1. Draw another portrait using pastels.  Don’t trace the outlines of the face or use a grid.  Draw everything in the picture yourself.  Use a photo that you took yourself.
  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  3. Look at all of these pastel portraits.  Maybe some of them will give you ideas for your portrait.  Draw copies of some of these portraits if you want to, and post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty
  4. To keep certain parts of the drawing from getting pastel on them, you can cut shapes out of tape and stick them on the parts of the drawing that you want to keep clean.  You can also use tape for making straight edges.
  5. You should rub a little powdered pastel on your fingertip before you use it for blending.
  6. Hairspray may turn colors more brown or gray than they should be.
  7. You can draw with pastel on top of hairspray almost as well as you can without hairspray.
  8. In a pastel drawing, hairspray may darken colors and make it seem as if there were finger smudges in the drawing and colors were not blended well.

Lesson 107

  1. Read about The Chocolate Girl.
  2. Study The Chocolate Girl carefully.  Click on it to see it up close.
  3. Write a paragraph about The Chocolate Girl.  Don’t write about the artist, or the subject matter.  Write about the technique.
  4. Acrylic paint can be used for underpaintings and to change the color of the paper.  You can draw with white and black pastel on gray paper.  You can paint a piece of white paper gray with watercolor and then draw with white and black pastel on that.

Lesson 108

  1. Draw another portrait using pastels.  Don’t trace the outlines of the face or use a grid to help you draw.  Use a photograph that you took yourself.
  2. If you have watercolor paints, watercolor paper and brushes that work well with watercolor, try painting with watercolor first and then drawing with pastel on top of the painting after it is completely dry.  Here is an example of a portrait that was done with watercolor paints and pastel.
  3. White areas should not be covered in a dark underpainting.
  4. If a watercolor underpainting is used in a pastel drawing, the colors should be more vivid and a little bit darker in the underpainting than they will be in the final drawing.  That will make the colors glow and be more realistic.  The watercolor underpainting should be realistic, but not detailed.
  5. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  6. Look at this portrait.
  7. Look at this portrait.
  8. Read this.
  9. You can use paintbrushes to blend colors together, dilute pastel with water and paint with it, or brush particles of eraser or pigment off the paper.
  10. Pastel is difficult to mix.  One way to mix pastel is to crush bits of different colored pastel sticks into a bowl, grind the pastel fragments into powder and apply the powder to the paper with a tissue or a bit of cotton.
  11. Powdered pastel can be mixed with water and used like watercolor paint.  It is more opaque and grainy than watercolor paint.
  12. You can use powdered pastel pigment mixed with water to paint a picture and then draw on top of it after it is dry.

Lesson 109

  1. In a pastel drawing, the emphasis can be on line and form, on color, on chiaroscuro, on action, on texture, on light, on the natural qualities of the pastel, or on the natural qualities of the support used.
  2. Here is an example of a drawing that emphasizes line and form.
  3. Here is an example of a drawing that emphasizes color.
  4. Here is an example of a drawing that emphasizes chiaroscuro.
  5. Here is an example of a drawing that emphasizes light.
  6. Here is an example of a drawing that emphasizes the natural qualities of the pastel.
  7. Here is an example of a drawing that emphasizes texture.
  8. Here is an example of a drawing that emphasizes the natural qualities of the support used.
  9. Here is an example of a drawing that emphasizes action.
  10. What do you tend to emphasize in your drawings?
  11. Read about painting on grounds.
  12. Read this.
  13. In pastel drawings that emphasize texture, spraying each layer of pastel with hairspray before moving on to the next layer will make the drawing more textured, but not using hairspray will make the drawing softer.

Lesson 110

  1. Draw another portrait using pastels.  Don’t trace the outlines of the face or use a grid to help you draw.  Use a photo that you took yourself.
  2. Read about surfaces for drawing with pastels.
  3. Read about using pastels on canvas.
  4. If you have a canvas, try drawing your portrait on that instead of a piece of paper.
  5. Here is an example of a drawing that was done with pastels on canvas.
  6. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  7. Look at this portrait.
  8. Look at this portrait.
  9. You can draw with pastel on many different surfaces.  You should experiment with drawing on cardboard, sandpaper, handmade paper, newspaper, bricks, fabric, wood, painted walls, concrete, the front of a canvas, and the back of a stretched canvas.
  10. You can glue sand or sawdust or small rocks onto paper, wood, or cardboard to create a textured support for a pastel drawing.  Texture attracts the eye and adds visual interest to drawings.
  11. Smooth, flat, thick cardboard is best for pastel drawing.  Textured cardboard does not work well.  Smooth wood is best for pastel drawing.

Lesson 111

  1. Draw another portrait using pastels.  If you can, glue a piece of thick, rough, light colored cloth to a thin board and try drawing the portrait on that.  Use a photo that you took yourself.
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  2. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  3. Look at these pastel drawings.
  4. Before you draw on a wall, you need to wash it.  Drawing on concrete uses up pastel much more quickly than drawing on paper does.  The rough surface of bricks holds pastel well.
  5. Fabric needs to be attached to a firm, hard surface before it is used as a support for pastel drawing.  Light colored fabric is best.
  6. Look at this pencil drawing.

Lesson 112

  1. Realistic drawings cannot be created on the front of a canvas because of its texture.
  2. Pastel pencils don’t work well on canvas.
  3. There needs to be a flat, hard surface on the front of a stretched canvas while a drawing is being done on the back.
  4. Drawing on canvas uses up pastel much more quickly than drawing on paper does.
  5. Pastel adheres better to unprimed canvas than it does to paper.
  6. This drawing was done with pastels on a piece of rough cloth glued to a board.  You can copy it if you want to.  It is more like a painting than a drawing.
  7. I used one color at a time, and the pastel blended together because of the surface I was drawing on.
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Lesson 113

  1. Now you’re going to learn how to draw using charcoal.
  2. Before you start drawing, experiment with using charcoal.  Try drawing on different kinds of paper, try using different types of charcoal, try using different materials to blend the charcoal, and try using different erasers on different kinds of charcoal.
  3. Read this and follow the directions.
  4. Read about how to draw with charcoal.
  5. Follow the directions.  Draw the portrait, still life, and the view from your window.
  6. Use vine charcoal, and after you’ve turned the whole paper black, rub the whole paper with a paper towel or napkin using a circular motion.  This will make the paper a little lighter.
  7. Cover the paper in charcoal again and rub it a second time.  Start drawing.
  8. Use both a hard eraser and a kneaded eraser.  After you’ve finished using the erasers, you can add some darker spots to your drawings with a piece of charcoal.
  9. Sign your drawings when you’re finished, and post them to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawings and have improved your drawings, upload them to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  10. You can spray your charcoal drawings with fixative when you’re finished, but the fixative might smear the drawings or make some areas darker or lighter than they were before.

Lesson 114

  1. Read this and draw the rhinoceros.  If you don’t have brown paper, use a different color of paper or try covering a piece of paper in light brown pastel and rubbing the pastel into the paper with a paper towel until the whole paper is a smooth, even tone.
  2. For drawing the light tones, you can use a white pastel, a piece of white chalk, a white Conte crayon, or a piece of white compressed charcoal.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 115

  1. Read about drawing with charcoal.
  2. Draw a still life using charcoal.  This time, instead of creating highlights with an eraser, use a white pastel or a piece of white chalk or a white Conte crayon or a piece of white compressed charcoal.  Draw from life.
  3. Add the highlights last.  Don’t use charcoal after you’ve added highlights.  Don’t blend the highlights with the charcoal.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  5. Look at this portrait.

Lesson 116

  1. Read about charcoal.
  2. Click on each of the questions to read the answers.
  3. Read this.
  4. Read this and draw the eye.  Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  5. Look at this portrait.

Lesson 117

  1. Look at this charcoal portrait.
  2. Draw a portrait using charcoal.  Don’t trace the outlines of the face or use a grid to help you draw.  Use a photo that you took yourself.
  3. Leave the paper white this time and draw with the charcoal.  Don’t darken the paper with charcoal first and then draw with an eraser.
  4. Draw the outlines of the face using vine charcoal, because it’s easy to erase.  Use compressed charcoal for very dark areas.  Use charcoal pencils for drawing small details.
  5. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  6. Look at this portrait.

Lesson 118

  1. Look at all of these charcoal drawings and draw copies of some of them.  Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty

Lesson 119

  1. Read this.
  2. Read this.
  3. Draw a landscape or cityscape or seascape or skyscape using charcoal.  Use a photograph that you took yourself.  Don’t make a small drawing.  Use a very big piece of paper, or divide the photograph into four or six parts and draw your landscape on four or six different pieces of paper and hang all of them on the wall together.
  4. Post your drawing or drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  5. After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 120

  1. Read about how to make a drawing machine.
  2. Read about these other drawing machines.

Lesson 121

  1. Using charcoal, draw sketches of some of these paintings in your sketchbook.  Post your sketches to EP’s drawing flickr group.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty
  2. Choose a favorite painting from this list and write a paragraph explaining why it is your favorite painting.

Lesson 122

  1. Using charcoal, draw sketches of these sculptures in your sketchbook.  Post your sketches to EP’s drawing flickr group.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
  2. Watch this video.

Lesson 123

  1. If you can get someone to pose for you, draw his or her hands using charcoal.
  2. Draw on gray paper and use white pastel or white conte crayon or white chalk or white compressed charcoal for the highlights.
  3. If you can’t get anybody to pose for you, draw from this photograph.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  If you drew the hands from life, upload your drawing to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/ after you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved it.
  5. Look at this drawing.
  6. Look at this beautiful drawing done with vine charcoal on white paper.

Lesson 124

  1. If you have any sculptures in your house, draw them using charcoal and white chalk on gray paper.
  2. Draw these sculptures using charcoal and white chalk on gray paper.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
  3. Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. Look at this drawing.
  5. Look at this portrait.

Lesson 125

  1. Read about how to draw fabric folds.
  2. Draw at least ten of the clothed figures in these pictures.  Use charcoal or graphite pencil.  You don’t need to shade your drawings if you don’t want to.
  3. Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 126

  1. Practice figure drawing from life whenever you can get somebody to pose for you.
  2. Maybe you can draw people while they’re asleep or while they are working on the computer or watching TV.
  3. Look at these figure drawings.
  4. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 127

  1. Read this.
  2. Draw some of the people in these paintings.  Use charcoal, pencil, pastel or conte crayon.  Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 128

  1. You can mix charcoal and graphite pencil together in a drawing.  You might want to use graphite pencil for light areas and charcoal for dark areas because charcoal does not reflect light like graphite pencil does.
  2. Experiment with mixing charcoal and graphite pencil together on a separate piece of paper before you use them together in a drawing.
  3. Read this.
  4. Draw a portrait using pencils and charcoal.  Draw it the same way you would if you were drawing with just pencils, but use charcoal instead of pencil for very dark areas like the pupils in the eyes.  Use a photo that you took yourself.
  5. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  6. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 129

  1. Look at these drawings.  Click on each drawing to see it close up.
  2. Look at these drawings.  Click on each drawing to see it close up.
  3. Look at these drawings.  Click on each drawing to see it close up.
  4. Set up a still life and take a photograph of it.  Draw the still life using charcoal and graphite pencil together.  You can draw it from life, or you can draw it from the photograph you took, or both.  Make your drawing as realistic and detailed as possible.
  5. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 130

  1. A trompe l’oeil drawing is a drawing that is so realistic that when people look at it they usually think the objects in the drawing are really there.
  2. The objects in these drawings must have a depth that appears to be no more than two or three inches because objects with too much depth would only look real when viewed from one angle.  The goal of trompe l’oeil drawing is to trick the viewer into thinking the objects in the drawing are real.
  3. Read about trompe l’oeil art.
  4. The Old Violin by William Harnett is a famous trompe l’oeil painting.  Read about this painting.  Keep clicking next until you get to the last page.
  5. Look at these trompe l’oeil drawings.
  6. Set up a still life for a trompe l’oeil drawing.  For trompe l’oeil drawing, choose objects that are almost flat for your setup, like photographs, cards, newspapers, letters, sheet music, money, pencils, tape, pins, stickers, or string.
  7. Don’t include living objects in your setup.  People will expect them to move and that will destroy the illusion of reality.  Attach the objects to a board, wall or door and light them strongly with a single light source.
  8. It’s better to use artificial light to light your setup instead of natural light because natural light changes a lot.  Take a photograph of your still life setup.

Lesson 131

  1. Draw your trompe l’oeil still life using charcoal and graphite pencils.  Draw all the objects in your still life setup life size.  It’s best to draw from life because then you will be able to see more detail and the drawing will look more realistic, but if the light changes or something in your setup gets moved you can draw from your photograph too.
  2. Draw everything as realistically as possible.  How realistic your drawing is depends on how accurately you depict the different textures in your setup.
  3. Not all highlights are pure white.  Remember not to draw outlines around objects if you don’t actually see outlines in your setup.
  4. Trompe l’oeil drawing takes a long time and it’s difficult to do.  A successful trompe l’oeil drawing is more realistic than a photograph.  All the tones in the setup need to be reproduced exactly in order to trick viewers into thinking the objects in the drawing are really there.
  5. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  6. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 132

  1. Read this.  Experiment with using conte crayons.
  2. Read about conte crayons and follow the directions.
  3. Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. Read this and watch the videos.
  5. Read about conte crayons.

Lesson 133

  1. Read this.  Keep clicking next page until the portrait is finished.
  2. Take a photo to draw, and draw a portrait using conte crayon the way you just read about it being drawn.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  4. Look at this portrait.

Lesson 134

  1. Read this.  Click on Drawing a Portrait of Verna when you get to the bottom of the page.
  2. Draw a portrait using either conte crayon or charcoal.  Don’t trace the outlines of the face or use a grid to help you draw.  Use a photograph that you took yourself, or draw from life.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  4. Look at all of these pictures drawn using conte crayons.  Draw copies of some of them.  Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten

Lesson 135

  1. Read about shading.
  2. You can mix conte crayon and pastel together.
  3. Draw a picture using both conte crayon and pastel.  Draw it from life or use a photo that you took yourself.
  4. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  5. Look at this drawing.

Lesson 136

  1. Now you are going to learn calligraphy.  Calligraphy means beautiful writing.
  2. Read about how to write in calligraphy.
  3. Read about papers for calligraphy.
  4. Use a ruler and a pencil to draw six lines on a piece of calligraphy paper, like in my example page.
  5. With a calligraphy pen or calligraphy marker, try to copy all of these capital letters.

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You can use this practice paper too.

Lesson 137

  1.  Look at these different calligraphy fonts.  Copy all of the uppercase letters.  Copy the lowercase letters too, if you want to.
  2. Post what you wrote to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 138

  1. Try to copy all of these lowercase letters and numbers.
  2. Try to copy the names written at the bottom of the page, and then write your own name in three different ways.
  3. Write the names of everyone in your family.
  4. Post the names you wrote to EP’s drawing flickr group.

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Lesson 139

  1. Choose a bible verse and write it in calligraphy.
  2. Post the verse you wrote to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  3. After you have received feedback on your calligraphy and have improved your calligraphy, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 140

  1. Read about Islamic calligraphy.
  2. Look at the Arabic alphabet.  Copy the letters.  The Arabic alphabet is read from right to left.
  3. Post what you wrote to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. Look at these examples of Arabic calligraphy.
  5. Look at these examples of Christian Arabic calligraphy.  Choose a favorite one and try to copy it.  Post what you wrote to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  6. Look at these examples of Chinese calligraphy.
  7. Look at the Hebrew alphabet.  Copy the letters.  Post the letters you wrote to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  8. Look at these examples of Hebrew calligraphy.

Lesson 141

  1. Choose ten different bible verses and write each one on a separate piece of paper.  Decorate the paper.
  2. Here’s an example.  I drew the design around the verse with a pencil, traced the pencil lines with black ink, erased the pencil and then filled the design in with gold paint.
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  3.  Look at these bible verses for ideas.  Post the verses you write to EP’s drawing flickr group.
  4. After you have received feedback on your calligraphy and have improved your calligraphy, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  1. one
  2. two
  3. three
  4. four
  5. five
  6. six

Lesson 142

  1. Try to copy all of these capital letters.
  2. Try to copy these swashes.

Lesson 143

  1. Try to copy all of these capital and lowercase letters if you want to.
  2. Try to copy all of these letters.

Lesson 144

  1. Look at these calligraphy fonts.  Copy some letters if you want to.
  2. Look at these examples of calligraphy.  Copy some of them if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three  
    4. four
    5. five 
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen 
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty
  3. Read about creating an ink and gold border.

Lesson 145

  1. You can make pictures with the words you write.
  2. Look at these examples.  Copy some of them if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten

Lesson 146

  1. Look at these bible verses written in calligraphy.  Copy some of them if you want to.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty
  2. Read about drawn and painted borders.
  3. Read about acanthus leaves.

Lesson 147

  1. Look at these cards written in calligraphy.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten

Lesson 148

  1. Look at these paintings.  Choose five favorite paintings and draw copies of them using any medium or mixture of mediums that you want to.
    • one     Keep clicking Next at the bottom of the page until you get to the end.
    • two     Keep clicking Next at the bottom of the page until you get to the end.
    • three     Keep clicking Next at the bottom of the page until you get to the end.
    • four     Keep clicking Next at the bottom of the page until you get to the end.
  2. Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.

Lesson 149

  1. Read about mixed media.
  2. Read about mixed media.
  3. Draw a self portrait using at least three different drawing mediums.  If you have paints, you can use those too if you want.  You can also use yarn, fabric, stones, feathers, cardboard, sand, or anything else you want to use.  Be creative!
  4. Sign your name on the portrait in calligraphy.
  5. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group when you’re finished.
  6. After you have received feedback on your self portrait and have improved it, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  7. Write a paragraph describing your self portrait and how you created it.
  8. Read about how to make paper.
  9. Look at this portrait.

Lesson 150

  1. Look at all of these pictures of mixed media art.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty
  2. Watch this video.

Lesson 151

  1. Look at all of these examples of 3D mixed media art.

Lesson 152

  1. Look at these websites for ideas for creating mixed media art.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four

Lesson 153

  1. Look at all of these mixed media drawings.  Click next at the top of each page until you have looked at all of the drawings.  There are more than a hundred.  Many of them are trompe l’oeil drawings.
  2. If you like trompe l’oeil drawing, draw a trompe l’oeil still life in color.
  3. Post your drawing to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawing and have improved your drawing, upload it to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.
  4. Look at this drawing.  Write a paragraph describing it.
  5. Watch this video.

Lesson 154

  1. Look at these abstract drawings and write a paragraph explaining why you like or dislike abstract art.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty
  2. Create three abstract drawings.
  3. Post your drawings to EP’s drawing flickr group.  After you have received feedback on your drawings and have improved your drawings, upload them to http://fineartamerica.com/ or http://www.saatchiart.com/ or http://www.artbreak.com/.

Lesson 155

  1. Look at these trompe l’oeil drawings.  Write a paragraph explaining why you like or dislike trompe l’oeil art.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten
    11. eleven
    12. twelve
    13. thirteen
    14. fourteen
    15. fifteen
    16. sixteen
    17. seventeen
    18. eighteen
    19. nineteen
    20. twenty

Lesson 156

  1. Look at these sketchbook pages for ideas.
  2. Here are some more photos of sketchbook pages.
    • SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESSAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESSAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESSAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESSAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Lesson 157

  1. Look at these abstract drawings.
    1. one
    2. two
    3. three
    4. four
    5. five
    6. six
    7. seven
    8. eight
    9. nine
    10. ten

Lesson 158

  1. Look at these drawings.

Lesson 159

  1. A photorealistic painting is a painting that looks more like a photograph than anything else.
  2. Read about photorealism.
  3. Read some more about photorealism.
  4. Read these answers to the question “What’s the point of photo-realism, when you can take a picture of it?”
  5. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  6. Look at all of these examples of photorealistic paintings.
  7. Choose one favorite painting from the examples above and fill out this artwork critique form.
  8. Write a paragraph about your favorite painting and a paragraph about your least favorite painting from the examples above.
  9. Watch this time-lapse video of a hyper-realistic drawing of a bag of M&Ms.

Lesson 160

  1. A trompe l’oeil painting is a painting that is so realistic that the viewer is tricked into thinking that the objects in the painting are really there.
  2. Read about trompe l’oeil paintings and drawings.
  3. Read some more about trompe l’oeil art.
  4. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  5. Look at all of these examples of trompe l’oeil art.
  6. Choose a favorite painting from the examples above and fill out the artwork critique form.
  7. Write a paragraph about your favorite painting and a paragraph about your least favorite painting from the examples above.

Lesson 161

  1. In realistic artwork, the subject matter is painted as it appears in real life, not as it appears in photographs.  The primary goal of a realistic painting is to create a more convincing illusion of realism than a photograph would.
  2. Read about Classical Realism.
  3. Read about realism.
  4. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  5. Look at all these examples of traditional realistic drawings and paintings.
  6. Choose one favorite drawing or painting from the examples above and fill out the artwork critique form.
  7. Write a paragraph about your favorite painting or drawing and a paragraph about your least favorite painting or drawing from the examples above.

Lesson 162

  1. To paint in a painterly way means that the artist leaves the brushstrokes visible and emphasizes the natural qualities of the materials used to create the painting.
  2. Read about painterliness.
  3. Read about how to paint in an expressive or painterly style.
  4. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  5. Look at all of these examples of painterly paintings.
  6. Choose one favorite painting from the examples above and fill out the artwork critique form.
  7. Write a paragraph about your favorite painting and your least favorite painting from the examples above.
  8. Watch this time-lapse video of a painterly portrait being painted.

Lesson 163

  1. Impressionist painters try to re-create their general impression of a scene instead of depicting it accurately.
  2. Read about impressionism.
  3. Read some more about impressionism.
  4. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  5. Look at all of these examples of impressionist paintings.
  6. Choose one favorite painting from the examples above and fill out the artwork critique form.
  7. Write a paragraph about your favorite painting and a paragraph about your least favorite painting from the examples above.

Lesson 164

  1. Expressionist artists distort scenes and use unnatural colors to show their emotions rather than show scenes as they really are.
  2. Read about expressionism.
  3. Read some more about expressionism.
  4. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  5. Look at all of these examples of expressionist art.
  6. Choose one favorite painting from the examples above and fill out this artwork critique form.
  7. Write a paragraph about your favorite painting from the examples above and a paragraph about your least favorite painting from the examples above.

Lesson 165

  1. A surrealistic painting is a painting depicting a scene that the artist dreamed or imagined.
  2. Read about surrealism.
  3. Read some more about surrealism.
  4. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  5. Look at all of these examples of surrealistic artwork.
  6. Choose one favorite painting from the examples above and fill out the artwork critique form.

Lesson 166

  1. Cubists break up the subject matter, turn it into flat shapes, and re-assemble it on the canvas.  Cubism emphasizes the two-dimensionality of the canvas rather than the three-dimensionality of the subject matter.
  2. Read about cubism.
  3. Read some more about cubism.
  4. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  5. Look at all of these examples of cubist artwork.
  6. Choose a favorite painting from the examples above and fill out this artwork critique form.
  7. Write a paragraph about your favorite painting and a paragraph about your least favorite painting from the examples above.

Lesson 167

  1. Abstract art is art that looks nothing like anything that is real.
  2. Read about abstract art.
  3. Read some more about abstract art.
  4. Write a paragraph explaining the positive and negative aspects of this style.
  5. Look at all of these examples of abstract drawings and paintings.
  6. Choose one favorite drawing or painting from the examples above and fill out this artwork critique form.
  7. Write a paragraph describing your favorite painting and a paragraph describing your least favorite painting from the examples above.
  8. Watch this time-lapse video of an abstract painting being painted.

Lesson 168

  1. Write a paragraph describing the best drawing you have ever done.

Lesson 169

  1. Write an essay about your favorite artist.

Lesson 170

  1. Write an essay about your favorite drawing or painting style.  Explain why you think that this style is best.
  2. If you have thought of any new drawing or painting techniques, write them down.
  3. God gave you the ability to draw for a reason.  Ask him how he wants you to use your talent.
  4. Be very careful not to let art distract you from God.

Congratulations, you’re finished!

14 thoughts on “Drawing Professionally

  1. Sheiks August 12, 2015 / 4:17 am

    I’m a homeschool mom and I’m so excited to try this course for myself. I do a little drawing but not at this level, always wanted it and this is my opportunity. Thank you.

  2. Joyce August 13, 2015 / 12:42 am

    Your generosity is awesome. You are giving to so many this opportunity to fulfill their hearts desire. I can’t thank you enough. Thank you!

  3. Elizabeth Collins-Krafve August 21, 2015 / 1:02 pm

    This is awesome, thank you for doing his

  4. Kristina September 20, 2015 / 1:17 am

    Wow! Really amazing course! Thanks so so much!!!

  5. Kyla Wallace December 3, 2015 / 6:24 pm

    This really is amazing!

  6. Christina January 5, 2016 / 3:20 pm

    Wow! Your daughters drawing of herself is amazing and beautiful!! My 11 year old daughter has teased for art lessons, she loves stuff like this. I think this will be perfect for her and she is motivated enough to pursue it herself being that she wants to learn it.
    Thanks so much for all the work you put into your sites! God Bless you and your family!

  7. Ava L April 8, 2016 / 4:28 pm

    Thank you for this course, though it is too advanced for me. 😉

  8. Abbi homeschool KID May 31, 2016 / 5:06 pm

    I’ve always wanted to draw this well i love that you’ve done this i’m 13 and really like to draw but i’m horrible i think this is great for me and anyone who likes anything ive learned alot and really well and i’m only on lesson 5

  9. asa maynard June 1, 2016 / 10:05 pm

    Wow!!! fantastic site, you’re blessed with a gift and to share it with others is most appreciated! Thank you! Asa in New Mexico USA

    • Grace May 12, 2017 / 5:11 pm

      I know right!!!!! God’s blessed this lady.!!!! AMEN

  10. Rebecca July 11, 2016 / 5:53 pm

    My little girl Grace LOVES Art she is very good at it>

  11. Rebecca July 11, 2016 / 5:55 pm

    Grace L O V E its her stylel LOL!!!!!!!!!!

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