Virtual Curling Stone Collisions Lab

Purpose: In this lab, we are going to look at some of the factors determining the paths of two curling stones following a collision between the stones. You will be able to change the separation between the centers of the stones. You will be able to change the masses of the stones and the speed of the hurled stone. You will be able to get the velocity of each stone after the collision.

Scenarios:

  1. For a one-dimensional collision (vertical separation of centers is 0), how does increasing the mass of the red stone impact the final velocity of the red stone? The final velocity of the yellow stone?
  2. For a one-dimensional collision (vertical separation of centers is 0), how does increasing the mass of the yellow stone impact the final velocity of the red stone? The final velocity of the yellow stone?
  3. For a one-dimensional collision (vertical separation of centers is 0), how does increasing the initial speed of the red stone impact the final velocity of the red stone? The final velocity of the yellow stone?
  4. For a two-collision (vertical separation of centers is not zero), how does increasing the mass of the red stone impact the final velocity of the red stone? The final velocity of the yellow stone?
  5. For a two-dimensional collision (vertical separation of centers is not zero), how does increasing the mass of the yellow stone impact the final velocity of the red stone? The final velocity of the yellow stone?
  6. For a two-dimensional collision (vertical separation of centers is not zero), how does increasing the initial speed of the red stone impact the final velocity of the red stone? The final velocity of the yellow stone?

For each scenario:

  1. Write a short procedure that will give you the necessary data for each calculation. 
  2. Identify the independent variable(s) and the dependent variable(s).
  3. Identify any formulas you will use and how each variable will be collected.
  4. Create a data table and provide data for at least five trials.
  5. Create a relevant graph in which you compare the bold variable to the final velocity of the red stone. Your graph should include relevant titles, axis titles, scale, units, and should use at least 80% of the graph area. 
  6. Create a relevant graph in which you compare the bold variable to final velocity of the yellow stone. Your graph should include relevant titles, axis titles, scale, units, and should use at least 80% of the graph area. 
  7. Write a brief conclusion (at least two sentences but no more than five) in which you answer the scenario prompt. 

 

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